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Hi,

Could someone please explain the difference between 'each other' and 'one another'?

Can we use both when there are two or more than two people?

The two people faught each other/one another in the street.

The five people faught each other/one another in the street.

Thanks in advance.
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Comments  
The phrase 'each other' is often used to refer to two people. It can be used to refer to more than two people. The rule is not strictly followed. 'One another' is used to refer to more than two people.
I think "one another" can be used for two people too, which makes the differences between those two expressions nonexistent. I personally would not say there's a difference. Emotion: smile
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Extracted from Collins Cobuild Advanced Learner's English Dictionary:
You use one another to indicate that each member of a group does something to or for the other members.
           ...women learning to help themselves and one another... 
Hi Yoong (or Liat? I've never known how to shorten it, lol),
are you saying that Collins Cobulid necessarily implies that "one another" can't be used with two people? Well, I don't know if that's Collins' intention, but Longman doesn't seem to agree, for example:
One another: each other - Liz and I have known one another for years.

Also, Merriam Webster says: Some handbooks and textbooks recommend that each other be restricted to reference to two and one another to reference to three or more. The distinction, while neat, is not observed in actual usage.

Based on that, and on some comments written by some native speakers, I decided not to make any distinction. That's all. Emotion: smile
Hi Kooyeen
Extracted from Collins Cobuild Advanced Learner's English Dictionary: 
You use one another to indicate that each member of a group does something to or for the other members.

           ...women learning to help themselves and one another...

Can 'group' refer to two people?  It is definitely more than two. This clearly tells us that Collins Dictionary says that 'one another' is used with regard to more than two people. Emotion: smile
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All those who have been exposed to English usage for a long time have noticed that the two pairs of words are used interchangeably in practice irrespective of what some grammarians recommend. This is what Webster's Dictionary says about the two:

Usage. Although some insist that EACH OTHER be used only in reference to two (The two candidates respected each other) and ONE ANOTHER in reference to three or more (The three nations threaten one another), in standard practice they are interchangeable. EACH OTHER is not restricted to two, nor is ONE ANOTHER restricted to three or more.

CB
There is a traditional rule that each other is used when two elements are being discussed and one another is used of more than two elements. 
It has been argued that the rule at least creates a helpful distinction: it is useful to know that We help each other refers to two people, whereas We hate one another refers to more than two. 
The rule cannot be ignored. If you disobey it, there are certain consequences that you must be prepared to take – in this case, the disapproval of the purists, and possibly the consequent loss of their trust in what you are saying. And this is not a small price to pay. If your object in speaking or writing is to communicate certain ideas, then obviously you should avoid provoking or distracting your listeners or speakers. Since there is no great difficulty in observing the rule, and since failure to observe it might involve you in pedantic complications, it is as well to observe it – as a rule. 
(The Right Word at the Right Time)
Well, what can I say? I just don't agree with that, not even with the underlying assumptions and principles. Rules should be understood, not just followed. Just because a minority of purists insist on prescriptive rules that don't make sense from a linguistic point of view, doesn't mean everyone has to believe them, let alone even worry about their disapproval.
Yoong LiatIt has been argued that the rule at least creates a helpful distinction: it is useful to know that We help each other refers to two people, whereas We hate one another refers to more than two.
That seems like a dangerous statement to me. That rule would mislead learners into thinking something that is not true and that is also likely to cause misunderstanding, instead of improving their English toward the naturalness of native speech.

As for Collins' definition, just because it is a definition on a dictionary, doesn't necessarily mean it has to be taken literally. Learner's dictionaries have simplified definitions, and they are often inaccurate. Just take this one from Longman, the definition of "finger": one of the four long thin parts on your hand, not including your thumb. - which is inaccurate, because your thumbs are fingers too (Merriam-Webster is more accurate and points that out).
Whenever I have doubts about a definition, I ask here on EF, so I wouldn't take every definition as a strict rule to interpret literally.

Anyway, the vast majority of people seem to agree there's no difference in meaning between them, so... I will definitely keep on considering them that way. Emotion: smile
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