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The team members kept getting in each other's way.

The team members kept getting in each others' way.


Which is right, and why?

Thank you.
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English is nearly consistent and logical with regard to the position of the genitive apostrophe. If there is no s at the end of the word in its basic form, the apostrophe comes before the genitive s. In other words, your first sentence is correct.

We like each other.
Not: We like each others.

Therefore: We like each other's names.

CB
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The team members kept getting in each other's way. Is correct.
Because you tell that members kept in each other's way (in the way of each other )
Thank you!
It would be "each other's." The main clue is "each," which is singular.
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Wouldn't it be more correct to say?

The team members kept getting in one another's way. (as it is likely that there are more than two of them)

Hmm.

But it is that we like each other's names, or do we like each other's name?

cpu desk it is that we like each other's names, or do we like each other's name?

we like each other's name

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Is "at each other's throats" correct?

Should it be "at each other's throat"?