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Hi,

I don't know what's happening to me. I'm having an awful lot of trouble finding the right structure for a sentence which would normally occur to me naturally. Take a look:

"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews where he edits himself in / into.
"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews in which he edits himself in / into.
"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews into which he edits himself.
(!?)
"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews (that) he edits himself in / into. (What an ugly sentence!)
...

I'm aware that most of these sentences don't work, yet I can't seem to figure out why. This is just RIDICULOUS! I've never had any problems with this kind of sentence before. Why is it suddenly so hard for me to construct such a simple statement? Linguistically speaking, it's as if I've regressed to the level of an infant... I think I've been exposed to too much broken English again... It always has that effect on my brain.

P.S.: Anything else wrong with this post? As I said, I'm presently in a state of confusion... It seems to be happening increasingly these days. Ugh!
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Hi,

"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews where he edits himself in / into.
"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews in which he edits himself in / into.
"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews into which he edits himself.
(!?)
"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews (that) he edits himself in / into. (What an ugly sentence!)

Only the blue ones seem OK to me. In my opinion, #4 is by far the more natural and common. It doesn't seem ugly to me.

Best wishes, Clive
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Clive"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews where he edits himself in / into.
"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews in which he edits himself in / into.
"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews into which he edits himself.
(!?)
"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews (that) he edits himself in / into. (What an ugly sentence!)

Only the blue ones seem OK to me. In my opinion, #4 is by far the more natural and common. It doesn't seem ugly to me.
I'm not sure I understand. The first two forms seem to work in the following statement: "Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his songs in which / where he parodies popular radio tunes.
Hi,

"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews where he edits himself in / into.
"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews in which he edits himself in / into.
"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews into which he edits himself.
(!?)
"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his fake celebrity interviews (that) he edits himself in / into. (What an ugly sentence!)

Only the blue ones seem OK to me. In my opinion, #4 is by far the more natural and common. It doesn't seem ugly to me.

I'm not sure I understand. The first two forms seem to work in the following statement: "Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his songs in which / where he parodies popular radio tunes.

Yes, that's OK, but you haven't used the same wording as you did in the original two examples. If you did that, your new example would read like this.

"Weird Al" Yankovic is famous for his songs in which / where he parodies popular radio tunes in / into. And that's not correct.

Best wishes, Clive
Thanks, it all seems so clear now. I'm not sure how I got so confused in the first place. I have one more question regarding this kind of sentence. We often use "where" and "in which" in reference to events, books, films, etc. (ex: "a meeting where the fate of the nation was decided", "the movie where Paul Muni plays a gangster loosely based on Al Capone", yadda yadda yadda...), but can they also used in describing, say, a food item or a recipe? For example:

"She served her guests a meatloaf where the meat was really dog food."
"The caterer delivered Napoleon cakes where / in which the cream and custard had been substituted with a light chocolate mousse."

Personally, I think these sentences are fine, but I'd like to know whether this usage is acceptable in "standard" English.
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Hi,
They seem OK to me.

Clive