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Tips for small doctors: How to increase the efficiency of your work

As a small doctor, we're all facing a big workload and a lot of chore, and we're used to work overtime so as to sigh frequently that we just eat, sleep in addition to the tiresome work burden, and have no time to combine clinical cases and practical questions with the knowledge we've leanrt from the books. Years past, and we as a training doctor in the in-patient department have develped an ability of receiving and sending patients, prescribing drugs, editing case histories etc. But we've learnt a little about theoretical knowledge. How to complete a bunch of trivial duties efficiently within 8 working hours? How to have spare time to learn the books after off duty? How to keep calm when facing a retardance-acted patient? How to adapt yourself to the bureaucratic style of our hospital departments to avoid getting your working progress affected? .... These are my confusions, and also might be your troubles. I am looking forward to that you will tell us your experience, and hope you offer questions here for our further discussion -- Tips for our small doctors to increase the efficiency of our work.
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Hi,

The term 'small doctor' is not correct. It sounds like a doctor who is the opposite of 'very tall'. Emotion: smile Perhaps you meana family doctor, or a general practitioner (a GP)?

As family doctors, we're all facing a big workload and many trivial tasks. We're used to working overtime so as to sigh frequently (<<<< sounds a bit odd, say it another way )that we just eat and sleep, and have no time to combine clinical cases and practical questions with the knowledge that we've learnt from books. Years past, (<<< I don't understand what you mean) and we as training doctors in the in-patient department have developed ability to admit and discharge patients, to prescribe drugs, to write case histories, etc. But we've only learnt a little theoretical knowledge. How to complete a lot of trivial duties efficiently in 8 working hours? How to have spare time to learn from books in our leisure time? How to keep calm when facing a retardedd patient? How to adapt ourselves to the bureaucratic style of our hospital departments to avoid negative effects on our working progress? .... These are my confusions, and also might be your troubles. I am looking forward to your telling us about your experience, and hope you offer questions here for our further discussion -- Tips for small doctors to increase the efficiency of our work.

I've done my best to edit this, but it still needs a lot of work.

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you Clive.

Your editing has inspired me a lot. "A small doctor" refers to "a little doctor" who just graduates from Medical School and have to undergo a clinical training for 2-3 years before being a qualified doctor in hospitals. A little doctor doesn't have the ability to independently operate a surgery, except those minor surgeries, like "a big doctor" does.

Well, does the so mentioned "little doctor" can be properly understood by native English speakers?

"Years past" refers to "the little doctor has spent 2-3 years on the clinical training". How to express this properly?

Regarding the odd expression " so as to sigh frequently ", can I write it as "so the little doctors sign quite often that they just eat and sleep..."?
Hi,

Your editing has inspired me a lot. "A small doctor" refers to "a little doctor" who just graduates from Medical School and have to undergo a clinical training for 2-3 years before being a qualified doctor in hospitals. A little doctor doesn't have the ability to independently operate a surgery, except those minor surgeries, like "a big doctor" does.

Well, does the so mentioned "little doctor" can be properly understood by native English speakers? No, definitely not. Say 'a new doctor' or 'a young doctor'.

"Years past" refers to "the little doctor has spent 2-3 years on the clinical training". How to express this properly? How about 'New doctors spend 2 to 3 years on clinical tarining'?

Regarding the odd expression " so as to sigh frequently ", can I write it as "so the little doctors sign quite often that they just eat and sleep..."?

'Sigh' or 'sign'? I think you mean 'sigh'. But instead, say 'New doctors complain quite often that they . . . '

Best wishes, Clive
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Thank you Clive.