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I have two statements I am tring to say

1) 'Skills Shortages and the effect they are having in the North East Housing Industry'

2) 'skills shortages within the housing industry are directly effecting the demand on housing input in the North East'

is the use off effect correct??

Thanks

Gary
Comments  
2: "Effect" is not transitive in this meaning. Use "affect" istead.
1. effect
2. affecting

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http://www.EnglishForward.com/search/affect effect.htm
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AnonymousI have two statements I am tring to say

1) 'Skills Shortages and the effect they are having in the North East Housing Industry'

is the use off effect correct??

Thanks

Gary
2) 'skills shortages within the housing industry are directly effecting the demand on housing input in the North East'

In # 2 "effecting" should be changed to "affecting". Effect is a noun, and [affect] is a verb.

The new drug for high blood pressure has many [side effects]. Noun use only.

These [side effects] seem to be [affecting] patients in the age group 50's and older. [noun] [verb]
«In # 2 "effecting" should be changed to "affecting". Effect is a noun, and [affect] is a verb.»

I said the same but is it true that "effect" cannot be a verb?
«The most skilful chemists have hitherto failed to effect such decomposition»

It can be a verb, though with a meaning different from that of "affect".
Hi Ant-222

Based on my understanding and verifification with Merriam Webster, [effect] can only be used as a noun. However, even the English experts have opposing views on the word [effect].

Main Entry: 1ef·fect
Pronunciation: i-'fekt, e-, E-, &-
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin effectus, from efficere to bring about, from ex- + facere to make, do -- more at
DO
1 a : PURPORT, INTENT b : basic meaning : ESSENCE
2 : something that inevitably follows an antecedent (as a cause or agent)
3 : an outward sign : APPEARANCE
4 : ACCOMPLISHMENT, FULFILLMENT
5 : power to bring about a result : INFLUENCE<the content itself of television...is therefore less important than its effect -- Current Biography>
6 plural : movable property : GOODS<personal effects>
7 a : a distinctive impression <the color gives the effect of being warm> b : the creation of a desired impression <her tears were purely for effect> c (1) : something designed to produce a distinctive or desired impression -- usually used in plural (2) plural : SPECIAL EFFECTS
8 : the quality or state of being operative : OPERATION<the law goes into effect next week>
- in effect : in substance : VIRTUALLY<the...committee agreed to what was in effect a reduction in the hourly wage -- Current Biography>
- to the effect : with the meaning <issued a statement to the effect that he would resign>

http://crofsblogs.typepad.com/english/2005/08/effect_as_a_ver.html - agreeing point of view

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/grammar/g_spelprob.html - disagreeing point of view view

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effect can be used as a verb. See in the M-W dictionary:

http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/effect
Select/click effect, [2, transitive verb] in the (drop-down) selection list.

Also, see the synonyms areas here:
http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/perform
for effect.
I call it my 99% rule.

99% of the time effect is a noun and affect is a verb (have an effect on, influence).
Only one in a hundred cases where the question is "Should I use affect or effect?" requires more than the 99% rule to solve the problem.

And yes, effect can be used as a verb (produce, create, cause), and affect can be used as a noun (feeling, emotion), but these usages are comparatively much less frequent. For all practical purposes these meanings can usually be dismissed from consideration.

CJ