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Is the noun 'effort' countable or uncountable?
If it can be either, what kind of cases are they for the countable 'effort' and what kind for the uncountable 'effort'? 
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I'd say it's uncountable: It will take a lot of effort. I can be done with little effort. You dind't put much effort into this, did you? It was a team effort.

However, idiomatically, we do say "Thanks for your efforts" or " Your efforts are appreciated."

We would not say "You will have to put in many efforts."
 Then, GG, is it 'You need to make more efforts' or 'You need to make more effort'?
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The word effort is frequently used as an uncountable noun. However, for that sentence, I'd probably say "You need to make more of an effort." By that I would basically mean "You need to try harder." It's very general.

The word "efforts" is used plenty often, and I would say the plural is used when you want to indicate that various different methods were used in an attempt to achieve something specific. Probably the best thing for you to do, Taka, is to look at the usage examples for "efforts" that you can find in COCA or the BNC .

Generally speaking, though, I'd say you would most likely to see the plural "efforts" used when it is modified -- by an adjective, for example.
YankeeThe word effort is frequently used as an uncountable noun.  However, for that sentence, I'd probably say "You need to make more of an effort."  By that I would basically mean "You need to try harder." It's very general.

Generally speaking, though, I'd say you would most likely to see the plural "efforts" used when it is modified -- by an adjective, for example.

If you were supposed to pick up one of the two which sounds the more natural, which would it be?  'You need to make more efforts' over 'You need to make more effort', because it is modified by 'more'?
I agree with Amy: "You need to make more of an effort" is the most natural.

"You need to put in more effort is okay," but "You need to make more efforts" is not at all natural.
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Hi Taka
Taka If you were supposed to pick up one of the two which sounds the more natural, which would it be? 'You need to make more efforts' over 'You need to make more effort', because it is modified by 'more'?
If you look at the usage samples in COCA, you will notice that the word "efforts" is frequently preceded by a possessive adjective. In other cases, there might be a reference to something such as "all of the R&D efforts". To me, these sorts of adjectives tend to point the word "effort" in a more specific or detailed direction. In other words, if I say "my efforts", I would know exactly what types of things my collective effort entailed.

The collocation "make an effort" is quite fixed with regard to the combination of the verb "make" and the countable singular "an effort". It is possible to insert "more of" in the middle, but trying to use the plural or the uncountable singular of "effort" will end up simply sounding wrong.
My dictionary seems to suggest that "effort" can be countable when it means "attempt", or something like that. I am thinking of "Despite all their efforts, they didn't manage to..."
In all other cases, it's just uncountable. Take a look at a learner's dictionary, you'll get plenty of examples. Emotion: smile
YankeeHi Taka

The collocation "make an effort" is quite fixed with regard to the combination of the verb "make" and the countable singular "an effort".  It is possible to insert "more of" in the middle, but trying to use the plural or the uncountable singular of "effort" will end up simply sounding wrong.

You mean both 'to make efforts' and 'to make effort' sound wrong, Amy?
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