I hear someone saying "I'll meet you at seven or eightish." I don't find "eightish" in dictionay. I guess it means "about eight o'clock". Can someone explain it a bit please?
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I hear someone saying "I'll meet you at seven or eightish." I don't find "eightish" in dictionay. I guess it means "about eight o'clock". Can someone explain it a bit please?

You're correct, it does mean "about o'clock". The ending "ish" is added to a word to suggest that it is approximate.
Another example would be:
"He's tallish" = "He's fairly tall" or "He's a bit on the tall side" "It was reddish" = "It was a colour that wasn't exactly red, but similar"

Be careful, though; some words end in "ish" without this meaning (eg "bookish" doesn't mean "a bit like a book").

Andrew Gwilliam
To email me, replace "bottomless pit" with "silverhelm"
Andrew Gwilliam put finger to keyboard in this fashion:
I hear someone saying "I'll meet you at seven or ... "about eight o'clock". Can someone explain it a bit please?

You're correct, it does mean "about o'clock". The ending "ish" is added to a word to suggest that it is ... Be careful, though; some words end in "ish" without this meaning (eg "bookish" doesn't mean "a bit like a book").

... and "goblet" doesn't mean a small gob.

David
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Andrew Gwilliam put finger to keyboard in this fashion:

You're correct, it does mean "about o'clock". The ending "ish" ... meaning (eg "bookish" doesn't mean "a bit like a book").

... and "goblet" doesn't mean a small gob.

Or ***, a small boll.

Ray
Andrew Gwilliam put finger to keyboard in this fashion:

You're correct, it does mean "about o'clock". The ending "ish" ... meaning (eg "bookish" doesn't mean "a bit like a book").

One meaning is just that:

#begin quote

1. Of, relating to, or resembling a book.
2. Fond of books; studious.
3. Relying chiefly on book learning: took a bookish rather than apragmatic approach in solving the problem.

4. Pedantic; dull. See Synonyms at pedantic.
5. Literary and formal in tone. Used of words.#end quote
... and "goblet" doesn't mean a small gob.

No, it is still the diminitive though, from 'gobel'.

"Throw me that lipstick, darling, I wanna redo my stigmata."

+-Jennifer Saunders, "Absolutely Fabulous"
Be careful, though; some words end in "ish" without this meaning (eg "bookish" doesn't mean "a bit like a book").

Not if said of a person, but it can if said of something shaped something like a book.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >Whatever it is that the government
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >does, sensible Americans would preferPalo Alto, CA 94304 >that the government do it to somebody

http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
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Andrew Gwilliam put finger to keyboard in this fashion:

One meaning is just that: http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=bookish #begin quote 1. Of, relating to, or resembling a book. 2. Fond of books; ... the problem. 4. Pedantic; dull. See Synonyms at pedantic. 5. Literary and formal in tone. Used of words. #end quote

I was trying to keep it simple!

Andrew Gwilliam
To email me, replace "bottomless pit" with "silverhelm"
Well, quite.

Andrew Gwilliam
To email me, replace "bottomless pit" with "silverhelm"
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