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May I ask a question about the usage of "either"? Please look at the following sentence first:

Either of the students is/are able to speak good English.

My grammar book says it's OK to use either "is" or "are" in the above sentence. But how about this one?

Either half of the cake is mine.

Either half of the cake are mine.

Is it still OK to use either "is" or "are" in the above sentences? I cannot figure it out and hope you could help me. Emotion: smileThank you very much!
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ViceidolMay I ask a question about the usage of "either"? Please look at the following sentence first:

Either of the students is/are able to speak good English.

My grammar book says it's OK to use either "is" or "are" in the above sentence. But how about this one?

Either half of the cake is mine.

Either half of the cake are mine.

Is it still OK to use either "is" or "are" in the above sentences? I cannot figure it out and hope you could help me. Emotion: smileThank you very much!
With "students", you might hear "are" from native speakers, but it is not highly regarded. With "half", use "is".
Comments  
In Section 174.2 of Practical English Usage, Michael Swan says that "A verb after 'either of' is more often singular...": 'Either of the children is perfectly capable of looking after the baby.'