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Could you help me explaining which ones of the following “B” answers are the most idiomatic ones (most used in spoken English!) and the most grammatically correct ones?

1.- Negative “A” sentences:

A: I can’t swim.
B1a: I can’t, either.
B1b: Neither can I.
B1c: Neither can me.
B1d: Me either.
B1e: Nor I either.
B1f: Nor can I. (¿Especially in British English?)

A: I don’t have any money right now.
B2a: I don’t, either.
B2b: Neither do I.
B2c: Neither do me.
B2d: Me either.
B2e: Nor I either.
B2f: Nor do I. (¿Especially in British English?)

A: I have never been to Paris before.
B3a: We haven’t, either.
B3b: Neither have we.
B3c: We either.
B3d: Nor we either.
B3f: Nor have I. (¿Especially in British English?)

A: I don't like horror movies.
B4a: I don’t, either.
B4b: Neither do I.
B4c: Neither do me.
B4d: Me either.
B4e: Nor I either.
B4f: Nor do I. (¿Especially in British English?)

A: I can’t help him.
B5a: I can’t, either.
B5b: Neither can I.
B5c: Neither can me.
B5d: Me either.
B5e: Nor I either.
B5f: Nor can I. (¿Especially in British English?)

A: She mustn’t go to the party on Saturday.
B6a: Paul mustn’t, either.
B6b: Neither must Paul.
B6c: Paul either.
B6d: Nor Paul either.
B6f: Nor must I. (¿Especially in British English?)

A: I won’t do that!
B7a: I won’t, either.
B7b: Neither will I.
B7c: Neither will me.
B7d: Me either.
B7e: Nor I either.
B7f: Nor will I. (¿Especially in British English?)

A: I may not go tomorrow.
B8a: I may not, either.
B8b: Neither may I.
B8c: Me either.
B8d: Nor I either.
B8f: Nor may I. (¿Especially in British English?)

2.- Positive “A” sentences:

A: I was to Paris last year.
B9a: So was I.
B9b: Me too.

A: We like horror movies.
B10a: So do we.
B10b: So do us.
B10c: We too.

A: I wrote him an email asking for some help.
B11a: So did I.
B11b: Me too.

A: You’ve got some excellent CDs yesterday.
B12a: So have you.
B12b: You too.

A: I can do that.
B13a: So can I.
B13b: Me too.

A: She must go to the party on Saturday.
B14a: So must I.
B14b: Me too.

A: I shall read the newspaper now.
B15a: So shall I.
B15b: Me too.

A: She will be here right now.
B16a: So will I.
B16b: So will me.
B16c: Me too.

A: Peter is going to buy a new computer on Tuesday.
B17a: So am I.
B17b: Me too.

A: I may go tomorrow.
B18a: So may I.
B18b: Me too.

Are the following “B” sentences more natural in spoken English than the “A” ones?:

A: The equipment is neither accurate nor safe.
B19: The equipment isn’t accurate or safe either.

A: She was expressionless, neither laughing nor crying.
B20: She was expressionless, not laughing or crying either.

A: I have neither the time nor the money.
B21: I haven’t the time or the money either.

A: He can neither read nor write.
B22: He can’t read or write either.

Are the following “B” sentences commonly used in SPOKEN English?

B23: Neither more nor less.
B24: Neither the one nor the other.
B25: Neither this nor that.
B26: Neither too much nor too little.
B27: Neither of your words are true.
B28: Neither of them knows what I did.
B29: Neither wish was granted.

B30: Either of you can go.
B31: You may have either book.
B32: Houses on either side of the road are more exposed to the sun.
B33: Is either right or wrong, there isn’t third position.
B34: Either come in or go out.
B35: If you don’t go, I’ll not either.
B36: I am not, nor have I ever been a wealthy man.
Is there another more informal and easier way to say the same (above sentences)?

Which ones of the following “B” answers are the most idiomatic ones (most used in spoken English!)

B37: I wasn't very impressed by his replies, nor his reasons.
B38: I wasn't very impressed by his replies or his reasons either.
B39: I was neither very impressed by his replies nor his reasons either.

I do hope that answer to the few amount of 39 questions is just a very little task to you in order to help a poor English student; neither too much nor too little, really?
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Comments  
A chaos for me too-- how about boiling it down to key questions, and then applying the response to all the modals, etc.?

Hint: all of these are wrong-- 'Neither will me'.
Dear Mister Micawber:
You may answer (it's just an example): Most idiomatic ones: B1b, B2d, B4e, etc
Please, help me. I'm really in trouble with these words!!
Eladio
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Eladio,

I had only got through about a third of these when the system timed out and I lost everything I was answering. I have no intention of going back and typing all that again.
You absolutely must post fewer questions in each post so that they can be answered in a reasonable amount of time.

California Jim
A: I can’t swim.
Neither can I.
Me neither.
I can't either.

A: I don’t have any money right now.
Neither do I.
Me neither.
I don’t either.

A: I have never been to Paris before.
Neither have we.
We haven’t either.

A: I don't like horror movies.
Neither do I.
Me neither.
I don’t either.

A: I can’t help him.
Neither can I.
Me neither.
I can’t either.

A: She mustn’t go to the party on Saturday.
Neither must Paul.
Paul mustn’t either.

A: I won’t do that!
Neither will I.
Me neither.
I won’t either.

A: I may not go tomorrow.
I may not either.
Me neither.

A: I was to Paris last year.
So was I.
I was too.

A: We like horror movies.
So do we.
We do too.

A: I wrote him an email asking for some help.
So did I.
I did too.

A: You’ve got some excellent CDs yesterday.
So have you.
You have too.
You too.

A: I can do that.
So can I.
I can too.
Me too.

A: She must go to the party on Saturday.
I must too.
So must I.
Me too.

A: She will be here right now.
So will I.
I will too.
Me too.

A: Peter is going to buy a new computer on Tuesday.
So am I.
I am too.
Me too.

A: I may go tomorrow.
I may too.
Me too.

Are the following “B” sentences more natural in spoken English than the “A” ones?
Not really.

The equipment is neither accurate nor safe.
The equipment isn't accurate, and it isn't safe either.

She was expressionless, neither laughing nor crying.

I have neither the time nor the money.

He can neither read nor write.
He can't read or write.
He can’t read, and he can't write either.

Are the following “B” sentences commonly used in SPOKEN English?

YES:
Neither more nor less.
Neither this nor that.
Neither too much nor too little.
Neither of them knows what I did.
Neither wish was granted.
Either of you can go.
Either come in or go out.
I am not, nor have I ever been, a wealthy man. > OK, but pompous.

NO:
Neither the one nor the other. > Neither one nor the other.
Neither of your words are true. > not logical > None of what you say is true.
You may have either book. > You can have either book.
Houses on either side of the road are more exposed to the sun. > not logical in my opinion
Is either right or wrong, there isn’t third position. > It's either right or wrong; there's no other possibility / there's nothing in between.
If you don’t go, I’ll not either. > If you don't go, I won't either.

_____

I wasn't very impressed by his replies or his reasons.

Lucky you, I found a copy and continued! Emotion: smile
I was going to post a question about this when I've found this old thread. Among all the possibilities listed here, I haven't seen that I was going to ask about. Can I answer with "She neither" to the sentence "He doesn't want to play"? From what I was taught, I would always answer "Neither does she". To me, "She neither" sounds awful, but there are three people here telling me it's all right. Is it grammatical, ungrammatical, acceptable in spoken English...? If it is wrong, is it the kind of mistake an uncultured native English speaker would make, or is it completelly foreign-sounding?

Also, would "Her neither" be well, too? It seems the equivalent to those "Me neither" CalifJim has said are correct, but I had naver heard it.

Thank you in advance for your help.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
ColomboI was going to post a question about this when I've found this old thread. Among all the possibilities listed here, I haven't seen that I was going to ask about. Can I answer with "She neither" to the sentence "He doesn't want to play"? From what I was taught, I would always answer "Neither does she". To me, "She neither" sounds awful, but there are three people here telling me it's all right. Is it grammatical, ungrammatical, acceptable in spoken English...?

I think it is OK in informal speech. See something similar, but not identical, on CNN:

-----
BRAZILE: Well, I don't think she's either. I develop a soft spot for
the domestic diva because I believe that she's being made out as a
poster child for corporate misbehavior.

I think Martha should cook up a humble pie serve it with some whipped
cream and dish it out to those prosecutors.

BLITZER: That sounds like good advice.

GOLDBERG: Donna thinks that she's neither. I think she's probably
both. I think she's both a crook and victim in this. I do think it's
probably overkill.

http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0306/08/le.00.html
---------
Marius HancuI think it is OK in informal speech. See something similar, but not identical, on CNN:

Umm, I think it's not alright even in informal speech, or at least I remember being told so. She can't either (ok) - She doesn't either (ok) - She neither (no) - So does she (ok) - She does too (ok) - So can she (ok) - She can too (ok) - She too (no)...

Just my opinion Emotion: smile
"She neither" makes me shudder.

Neither is/does/was she, or
She isn't/doesn't/wasn't either.
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