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Does anyone here understand elevator symbols? Tonight I was in an elevator which perplexed me again. There are 4 buttons ... so we all can play. (1) though the many variations show that the standard is often shot at and missed.

Some elevators have a front and rear door on on or another floor. Could that be it?

john
Tonight I was in an elevator which perplexed me again. There are 4 buttons that I finally figured out are in the 'door open' and 'door close' category, although it is not immediately clear which is which. Why four? The symbols are tall triangles that either face each other or face away. Two are just the triangles, and two have a line in the middle.

One possibility is that the control panel was meant for an elevator with doors on both sides, with one set of buttons controlling the "front" doors and the other set the "rear". Such an arrangement makes it even harder to hit the correct button in a hurry.
That must be it. It does have front and rear doors, although in normal operation only one set of doors at a time will operate, and when downstairs there is a wall behind the elevator. I suppose that it is possible for both doors to be open while upstairs. Still, it seems more clear to have just two buttons and let them operate all appropriate doors. And why does the symbol lose the bar in the middle?
When I was younger I was good at hitting the right button. I think elevators must have used the old-fashioned 'door open' and 'door close' labels before they came up with the improved versions.

Richard Maurer To reply, remove half
Sunnyvale, California of a homonym of a synonym for also.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Does anyone here understand elevator symbols? Tonight I was in an elevator which perplexed me again. There are 4 buttons ... not matter. This is a simple elevator. All it does is go from '1' to '2', and then back down.

Let's be more concerned with elevator cymbals.
Does anyone here understand elevator symbols?

Sadly, grasshopper, one of the most heart-wrenching difficulties of the human experience is man-elevator miscommunication.
Tonight I was in an elevator which perplexed me again. There are 4 buttons that I finally figured out are in the 'door open' and 'door close' category, although it is not immediately clear which is which. Why four?

The elevator in my office building has two open and two close buttons. One set is for the rear doors. One set is for the front doors.
the braille for the two open buttons is exactly the same, and the braille for the two close buttons is exactly the same. The line in the middle does not matter.

Perhaps the top set is front and the bottom set is rear.

Joseph
Ray Heindl:
One possibility is that the control panel was meant for ... controlling the "front" doors and the other set the "rear"...

Richard Maurer:
That must be it. It does have front and rear doors...

No it doesn't. You said it was a simple elevator, and a simple elevator doesn't have that. Besides, it's so obviously relevant that you would have mentioned it. (See signature quote.) You're just trying to trick us now, I can tell.
Still, it seems more clear to have just two buttons and let them operate all appropriate doors.

If the elevator is ever taken out of public use (for use by movers or the like), the people using it will typically expect individual control over the two doors. So two sets of buttons are needed.
And why does the symbol lose the bar in the middle?

That certainly has no mnemonic value for me.

Mark Brader, Toronto "Constrain your data early and often." (Email Removed) C. M. Sperberg-McQueen

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
So although I'm fully aware of what the (standard) symbols mean, my experience chimes entirely with what was stated on the website Richard cited:

Me three.
One solution in such a case is to press both the door-open and door-close buttons; door-open will then take precedence. However, I also find that when I need to find the right button, I don't think of that in time to do it. It's usually easier to use the safety stop (photocell or rubber strip with sensor) on the door itself.

If we must have the buttons identified by rebus puzzles, the door-open button really should be larger, or always lighted, or should have a distinctive standard color. Or leave the traditional English label and put the symbol beside the button.

Mark Brader > "And don't forget there were five separate computers (Email Removed) > in those days."
Toronto > Bob NE20G3018 (Ira Levin, "This Perfect Day")

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Does anyone here understand elevator symbols? Tonight I was in an elevator which perplexed me again. There are 4 buttons ... and the braille for the two close buttons is exactly the same. The line in the middle does not matter.

Richard is in the Bay Area, where a very large proportion of the population does not have English as its native language.

The law here requires that certain public notices and signage cater to people of that ilk.
The first two buttons are for anglo-speaking patrons.

The other two are for speakers of Spanish/Vietnamese/Hindi et al

That's my theory and I'm sticking to it.
Jitze
Does anyone here understand elevator symbols? Tonight I was in ... the same. The line in the middle does not matter.

Richard is in the Bay Area, where a very large proportion of the population does not have English as its ... patrons. The other two are for speakers of Spanish/Vietnamese/Hindi et al That's my theory and I'm sticking to it. Jitze

There's another angle if that's the right word to use to a Jute. The ones with a line in the middle are to attract the attention of female passengers. Ooops, 'Frisco you say?
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So although I'm fully aware of what the (standard) symbols mean, my experience chimes entirely with what was stated on the website Richard cited:

Me three. One solution in such a case is to press both the door-open and door-close buttons; door-open will then ... or should have a distinctive standard color. Or leave the traditional English label and put the symbol beside the button.

My place of employment moved to a newly constructed building about four years ago. Prior to that we were in a building constructed in the Seventies. The elevator panels in the earlier building had a single button centered at the top and clearly marked "door open." No one had the slightest trouble using it for its intended purpose. When we moved to the new building, there was an epidemic of bruised fingers as people poked the top center of the elevator panel only to encounter metal. Most seem to have given up on the "door open" button which now, needless to say, is marked with triangles, not the words and we now mostly wave an arm in the door opening or just let the doors close.
This is what we call "progress."

Liebs
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