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Richard is in the Bay Area, where a very large ... al That's my theory and I'm sticking to it. Jitze

There's another angle if that's the right word to use to a Jute. The ones with a line in the middle are to attract the attention of female passengers. Ooops, 'Frisco you say?

the ones with lines in the middle mean "keep the doors closed/open", while the ones free of such lines mean "open the closed doors/close the open doors". Or vice-versa. Try it and see.
(Email Removed) filted:
There's another angle if that's the right word to use to a Jute. The ones with a line in the middle are to attract the attention of female passengers. Ooops, 'Frisco you say?

I can't find the image just now, but I once saw a sign with the "man" and "woman" icons, a vertical line between them, and an arrow beneath each, one pointing up and the other down...people were asked to explain what it was supposed to represent (the designers apparently thought its meaning was self-evident)..
One theory was that it gave directions to the elevator in an orthodox synagogue..
One person looked at it and said "I'm not going it there...that says 'Purgatory'!"...r
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There's another angle if that's the right word to use ... attract the attention of female passengers. Ooops, 'Frisco you say?

I can't find the image just now, but I once saw a sign with the "man" and "woman" icons, a ... other down...people were asked to explain what it was supposed to represent (the designers apparently thought its meaning was self-evident)..

It is. Men go up; women go down.

Ray
I can't find the image just now, but I once saw a sign with the "man" and "woman" icons, a ... the elevator in an orthodox synagogue.. One person looked at it and said "I'm not going it there...that says 'Purgatory'!"...r

Much funnier than the simple-minded inference that the gents' loo is upstairs and the ladies' downstairs (or vice versa, depending on the arrows).

Liebs
One possibility is that the control panel was meant for an elevator with doors on both sides, with one set ... two buttons and let them operate all appropriate doors. And why does the symbol lose the bar in the middle?

If they made one button control both sets of doors, then you'd have to open both even if you wanted to open only one, causing unnecessary wear and tear.
Does the elevator have separate floor-select buttons for the front and rear doors? Most double-sided elevators that I've used have floor buttons labeled "2" and "2R", for example. You have to make your choice before you start moving (tricky if it's not obvious which is the rear), so the "open" button is needed if you make the wrong choice, though for that case only one button would be needed.
Ray Heindl
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Most double-sided elevators that I've used have floor buttons labeled "2" and "2R", for example.

Agreed. An exception is those where, although there are two sets of doors, only one is used at any particular floor; these need only the same controls that a normal elevator would have.
You have to make your choice before you start moving

Well, you do if you want it to be possible that only one door will open.
(tricky if it's not obvious which is the rear),

Usually it's the one that's behind you when you're facing the buttons. Of course, there are some elevators that have them on the side instead.
so the "open" button is needed if you make the wrong choice...

Not really; you can press 2 or 2R while the elevator is stopped at 2. (I don't say that this always works, but I would expect it to.)
Mark Brader, Toronto "Remember the Golgafrinchans" (Email Removed) Pete Granger
My place of employment moved to a newly constructed building about four years ago. Prior to that we were in ... mostly wave an arm in the door opening or just let the doors close. This is what we call "progress."

Somewhere I used to have a book called "design for the real world" by Victor someone or other.
It has some examples of very bad design from the period, which was about the time they were replacing "Door open" etc on lift control panels with symbols.
The one commonly used at that time were
>-> for door open
and
-> for close door

It was the opposite of intuitive, so people seeing someone rushing for the lift would pres the door close button, and shut the door in their face. Or, waiting for the doors to close when no one was getting in, would press the door open button and reopen them again.
Eventually lift manufactures twiggfed, and changed the symbols so something more intuitive.
But that confused people stiff further, who wherent sure which set of symbols was in use. They also put them at the bottom of the panel, at about waist height.
So now, being older, when I see someone running for the lift, I have to fish in my pocket for my glases, bend down an peer at the buttons and try to work out which symbol represent which action, by which time the onrushing perhspn has just avoidded decapitation, and glares at me, holding me responsible for pushing the button that did it, or else has mised the left altogether, as the door had closed before I was able to work out which button meant which.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
There's another angle if that's the right word to use ... attract the attention of female passengers. Ooops, 'Frisco you say?

I can't find the image just now, but I once saw a sign with the "man" and "woman" icons, a ... the elevator in an orthodox synagogue.. One person looked at it and said "I'm not going it there...that says 'Purgatory'!"...r

And what did the designers intend it to represent?

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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Steve Hayes filted:
I can't find the image just now, but I once ... to represent (the designers apparently thought its meaning was self-evident)..

And what did the designers intend it to represent?

I don't remember if the article I found it in ever revealed that..

There was once a comedian who took issue with the signs at road-construction sites explaining "orange cones mean men at work"...said that when he was stoned, he came up with a few other explanations, such as "psychedelic witches embedded in pavement" and "radioactive parrots escaping from the center of the earth"..

Some days when the internet connection at work is running slow, and I don't have any "funded" projects to work on (which, according to policy, means I'm not supposed to work at all, but I still have to be there), I amuse myself by trying to figure out what the toolbar icons in various Windows programs would mean to a completely ignorant observer..r
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