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I have to eliminate the word there to form a new sentence. But i am not sure if i write it correctly.

Original 1. There are many ways of handling the project.
my version 1. We can handle this project in many diffenert ways.

original 2. There you go again.
2. It happens again.

original 3. There must be a solution to this math problem.
3. We can solve this math problem.

original 4. Thee are several ways to describe a jerk.
4. You can descibe a jerk in different ways.

original 5. There will be no break if you don't get busy.
5. If you don't get busy, you won't be able to take break.

please give me some suggestion. thanks a lot
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Goodman

I know 'foods' can be used in other contexts. I've heard of 'health foods' and I don't dispute that term.

However, I believe “There are plenty of foods to go around” and "We have a lot of foods to go around" are not good examples of the usage of the word 'foods'.

I strongly believe that "There is plenty of food to go around” and "We have a lot of food to go around" are correct sentences. The plural form 'foods' is not suitable here.

I wonder whether native speakers of British English will agree with the 'foods' version.

I have never heard anyone using the plural version of the sentence before. That's why I find it hard to accept your version.
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Ok, I will give it one more try and I will leave it at that. what if someone says “I have plenty of foods left over from the party last night? Is that acceptable to you?
I hate to wade into the row that the two of your are enjoying so much, but I have to agree that the singular food sounds better in the context Yoong Liat describes.

I concur that "foods" is well established when describing different types of food (similar to like "fishes," but even more common), but plenty of food is the choice I'd make. The only time I might use foods in that type of context is if there were a display of different types, like Mexican, Chinese, Thai, Italian, etc.
I don't like the use of 'foods' in that context either.
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Grammar GeekI hate to wade into the row that the two of your are enjoying so much, but I have to agree that the singular food sounds better in the context Yoong Liat describes.

I concur that "foods" is well established when describing different types of food (similar to like "fishes," but even more common), but plenty of food is the choice I'd make.

Hi GG,

"The only time I might use foods in that type of context is if there were a display of different types, like Mexican, Chinese, Thai, Italian, etc.
Thai, Italian, etc."



That’s the context I had in mind. If you are invited to a party or celebration of some kind, usually there are plenty of “foods” which inferring abundance and variety. The question is how one wants to express the exact meaning of something. I would agree that in general, “plenty of food” may be more likely used. But the plural form in that context, however, is not wrong either in my opinion. I appreciate you input.
GoodmanThat’s the context I had in mind. If you are invited to a party or celebration of some kind, usually there are plenty of “foods” which inferring abundance and variety. The question is how one wants to express the exact meaning of something. I would agree that in general, “plenty of food” may be more likely used.

Hi Goodman

Just my two cents: Emotion: smile
I'd say "plenty of food" suggests abundance. I agree that "plenty of food" would be by far the most typical collocation.
>“There are plenty of foods to go around”. Vs. “Don’t worry”. We have a lot of foods to go around.

Yes, I would vote for the singular here too, in most of the circumstances.
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Goodman
Ok, I will give it one more try and I will leave it at that. what if someone says “I have plenty of foods left over from the party last night? Is that acceptable to you?

Goodman,

I've just returned after taking supper. Yes, indeed, I would accept if somebody tells me your version is correct. In fact, I've asked twice for the view of native British speakers but none of them responded. But finally four members have said the singular version is correct.

As forum members, we learn from one another. I've learned a lot from other members since I became a member of this forum. And I've also helped some of the members by answering their questions. And I'm happy to be able to help others just as much as I enjoy being helped by others

In conclusion, I would like to bring this matter to a close.