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Instead of saying

We drank and ate at her birthday.

can we say

We drank at her birthday, and ate.

or

We drank at her birthday and drank.

???????????????????????????

I am not asking which one sounds more correct or is easier to understand.

I am asking if they CAN mean the same thing or they ARE completely different sentences.
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Hi,
Instead of saying

We drank and ate at her birthday party.

can we say

We drank at her birthday party, and ate. Yes. It doesn't say clearly that the eating was at her birthday party, but that would be assumed.

or

We drank at her birthday party and drank. Why do you want to repeat 'drank'?

??

I am not asking which one sounds more correct or is easier to understand.

I am asking if they CAN mean the same thing or they ARE completely different sentences.

(You forgot to say 'please' in this post. )

Clive
Comments  
I would say the first and third are correct. The second is wrong because the second is a dependent clause.
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 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thank you.

So the three are correct?

Btw, I meant ate instead of drank.
Hi,
Yes, they are correct, ( although that wasn't your original question. ).

Of course, that doesn't mean that all three are natural, common, or have the same meaning.
Best wishes, Clive
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