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I can't make out some parts of what they say in this audio clip from this page even with the transcript. The parts are:

2:45 - "this home ?"
2:51 - "one little bick?"

3:52 - The transcipt says "Without giving too much away, I don't think you can go through something like that without it affecting you," but it doesn't sound "without giving" to my ears, instead "if we've given" or whatnot.

By the way, is there some way to upload directly a small audio clip file cut from larger one, or I'd better avoid that?
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I think

2:45 to 2:51 (this won't hurt one little bit)

3,52 ravaging her dreams and those of her classmates
Thanky you for answering.

>2:45 to 2:51 (this won't hurt one little bit)
It seems my ears are made of stone of something....
I can't hear "won't" and hear a syllable starts with h after "this" and next syllable starts with l or r, and last word's t sounds to me k.

>3,52 ravaging her dreams and those of her classmates
Here, the part I was confused is the part directly after this.
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darekaIt seems my ears are made of stone of something..
No, your ears are ok, but sometimes it is not possible to "hear" every single sound and so you need to "guess" (because there's some noise, or because the speaker has a different accent, or the speaker speaks really too fast, etc.). Even native speakers make guesses all the time, often unconsciously. You do it too. If your name is Patty, you are using a noisy vacuum cleaner and someone comes up to you and shouts your name, you will probably only hear something like eh-ee! and won't hear any consonant sounds... but you'll guess they're calling you, "Betty", even though they could have said Eddy, belly, Jenny, etc.

This won't hurt... one... little... bit!

He has a kind of hissing, breathy voice there, and so it does sound like "Thith hwon hurt... one... little... bikt" Or something like that, you know, there are some extra sounds that you could call "noise".

Without giving to much away...

That "without" there is pretty "complete" and clear though. The only sound that is not clear is the initial /w/ sound. Of course you can't hear the /t/ at the end either, but that's normal (and final /t/ is usually not fully pronounced anyway).

I'm not a native speaker, by the way. I'm just a guy who's been having the same problems and who's been trying to improve.
> This won't hurt... one... little... bit!
I know there are a lot of unconscious and conscious euphonies and elisions (and noises to non-natives) in languages when naturally spoken. But this one is far beyond me....

> Without giving to much away...
I played the part in slow speed again and I think I could hear "without". But then I don't understand what she means. I thought she was saying to the effect that if you give too much informations about the movie, it'll spoil the experience of the character as a part of viewer in the movie.

Thank you.
darekaBut then I don't understand what she means. I thought she was saying to the effect that if you give too much informations about the movie, it'll spoil the experience of the character as a part of viewer in the movie.
I think the actress ("...rising young actress Rooney Mara...") who's being interviewed is trying to say something about the movie, without giving too much away = trying not to say too much about the movie and spoil the viewing experience. In particular, I think she doesn't want to say too much about the character she plays ("Nancy").

She goes on to say "...we wanted that to be part of her character, so, I think... our Nancy is much darker, and she's disturbed, and trying to figure out why she is the way she is, and what happened to her, and... I think it really affects her".
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Now it seems I understand something. I suppose "without" works as a conjunction or something here and "it" of "without it affecting you" means "going through something like that".
I thought "it" meant "giving too much away".
So it is supposed to mean if she knows little she can't go through something like that without what happens to her affecting her. And so that the film creators want her to be obscure and disturbed?
The way I see it, "without giving too much away" is just something she says that is unrelated to the next sentence. That clause describes the way she's going to talk about the movie, that is, in the following part she tried not to give away too many interesting or important details:

I don't think you can really go through something like that without it really affecting you. We wanted that to be a part of her character, so I think our Nancy is much darker. She is disturbed and trying to figure out why she is the way she is and what happened to her. I think it really affects her.

I'm not sure what she really meant to say. I'm not horror movie expert either, since I don't really like them. My guess is that the actress is saying that a normal person can't go through such a shocking experience (fighting Freddy) without being psychologically affected by that, somehow. The actors and the producers wanted those psychological issues to be part of Nancy's personality, and so they portrayed her as psychologically "disturbed", introverted, etc.
> The way I see it, "without giving too much away" is just something she says that is unrelated to the next sentence.

It seems it is rather a set phrase and grammatically not much related to the following part as you say.
IIRC, the original movie (at least the first one) was a cross between a horror story and a mystery where you find and solve mysteries so that I might have thought they think keeping the people and things in the dark is important.
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