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Hi,

I am currently in a debate with my executive regarding an email I sent, which might have some grammatical errors- specifically where I write "hold off to spring of next year"... Is the wording here with to, instead of till or untill correct? Please let me know. Thank you.

See my email below:

David,

Thanks for the follow-up, and I apologize for the delayed response- I was away for the holiday break and just returned to the states. The jobs we were awarded are still in progress, but have a high possibility of completing earlier than anticipated. If you are willing to hold your start date for the renovation to Spring of next year, I will have an opening to bring in your project, and I will be happy to submit a new proposal based off the new architects designs. I will look forward to your response. Thank you.
Comments  
AnonymousI am currently in a debate with my executive regarding an email I sent, which might have some grammatical errors- specifically where I write "hold off to spring of next year"... Is the wording here with to, instead of till or untill correct? Please let me know. Thank you.
"till" is very informal. It is short for "until." The propositions we use are quite variable, and depend a lot on the preceding verb: eg.

Postpone the start date until next March or April.
Defer the start date to next March or April.
Put the start date off to / until next March or April.
Hold off on the start date until next March or April.
Thank you for your response. This is quite helpful. I might have to sign up on this board- I like the vibe here.

Another question: In the sentence below, is the use of to after renovation correct? If not, would until or till suffice as a replacement for "to" in the sentence?

"If you are willing to hold your start date for the renovation to Spring of next year.."
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I wouldn't just say "hold" if you mean "delay or postpone." To me, "hold your start date" suggests keeping to the current schedule rather than changing it. Use one of the variations CJ gave you instead. "Hold off on the start date" is okay.

As CJ's examples show, the preposition depends on which verb you choose.
khoffI wouldn't just say "hold" if you mean "delay or postpone." To me, "hold your start date" suggests keeping to the current schedule rather than changing it. Use one of the variations CJ gave you instead. "Hold off on the start date" is okay.As CJ's examples show, the preposition depends on which verb you choose.
I'm just realizing my error now, thank you for the note.
AlpheccaStars AnonymousI am currently in a debate with my executive regarding an email I sent, which might have some grammatical errors- specifically where I write "hold off to spring of next year"... Is the wording here with to, instead of till or untill correct? Please let me know. Thank you."till" is very informal. It is short for "until." The propositions we use are quite variable, and depend a lot on the preceding verb: eg.Postpone the start date until next March or April.Defer the start date to next March or April.Put the start date off to / until next March or April.Hold off on the start date until next March or April.
Would "Postpone the start date to Spring of next year" or "March etc..." still work?
Try out our live chat room.
AlpheccaStars"till" is very informal. It is short for "until."
Not everybody considers till short for until.

—Usage. TILL and UNTIL are both old in the language and are interchangeable as both prepositions and conjunctions: It rained till (or until) nearly midnight. The savannah remained brown and lifeless until (or till) the rains began. TILL is not a shortened form of UNTIL and is not spelled 'TILL. 'TIL is usually considered a spelling error, though widely used in advertising: Open 'til ten.
RHUD

CB
AnonymousWould "Postpone the start date to Spring of next year" or "March etc..." still work?
Yes, but Spring is a common, not proper, noun.

Postpone the start date to the spring of next year.