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He ended up telling his wife the truth.

If I added 'with' after the 'ended up' here, as:

He ended up with telling his wife the truth.

would it still sound OK?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Yes, Taka, that's a good expression. It means "he ended up thinking that...". Similar is "he was left with the idea that..."
GG,

Reading back carefully what you said, I got stuck on this part.
Grammar Geek He thought about asking is friend to lie.
What did you mean by 'about asking is friend'??
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Ah Taka, there you are, revealing my typing mistakes for all to see. I swear I typed "asking HIS friend" but apparently my fingers were going faster than my brain. I don't suppose you would believe that I have an odd accent and don't pronounce my H's? Anyway, his friend is what it should have said. I'm so sorry for causing you more confusion than I have provided in answers! I try to drop in here while I'm at work so sometimes I hit "post" before I've taken the time to proofread what I've written.
For a laugh (or a research project), consider:

He ended up with bupkis.

CJ
Jim, that's so funny you would write that. It was EXACTLY what I was thinking. But I wasn't sure how to spell it!
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Grammar GeekAh Taka, there you are, revealing my typing mistakes for all to see.
I didn't mean to expose your mistake to ridicule. Seriously, I didn't understand what you meant, until you explained it.
Grammar GeekJim, that's so funny you would write that. It was EXACTLY what I was thinking. But I wasn't sure how to spell it!
Ah...excuse me, folks...I don't know what you're talking about...
It's Yiddish, meaning "nothing."

He's left with bubkis (or however you spell it) means he has nothing left.
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I don't know what you're talking about...
Taka! That was supposed to be your research project! Emotion: smile

CJ
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