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He ended up telling his wife the truth.

If I added 'with' after the 'ended up' here, as:

He ended up with telling his wife the truth.

would it still sound OK?
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TakaHe ended up telling his wife the truth.

If I added 'with' after the 'ended up' here, as:

He ended up with telling his wife the truth.

would it still sound OK?
Yes, or "by".
No, it's a different meaning of the phrase.

To end up with means that's what remained. I ended up with three dollars after our day at the zoo.

To end up [doing someting] means that's the action you took, perhaps after a lot of thought or trying other things first.

I suppose, in your case, you could construct a scenario: Bill tried to think of a way out. He thought about lying. He thought about asking is friend to lie. But after a lot of consideration, he ended up with telling his wife the truth as the best course of action. (He had considered and rejected the other scenarios and what remained was the option to tell the truth.) But his is really not the meaning you intended, I think.
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I don't think with is OK in this context, with -ing forms. There aren't really many examples at Yahoo on that.

by is more acceptable.
Grammar GeekI suppose, in your case, you could construct a scenario: Bill tried to think of a way out. He thought about lying. He thought about asking is friend to lie. But after a lot of consideration, he ended up with telling his wife the truth as the best course of action.
GG,

So, it's not that 'end up with -ing' is grammatically unacceptable, but that the meaning is different from that of 'end up -ing'.

Did I get it right?
Seems some people don't like that use. Better to use "he ended up telling...".
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TakaGG,

So, it's not that 'end up with -ing' is grammatically unacceptable, but that the meaning is different from that of 'end up -ing'.

Did I get it right?
Yes, I think so. It's grammatically okay, but you really have to "stretch" to come up with a scenario that fits it, like I did. My example is awkard, I think, and I wouldn't write it that way naturally. I was trying to come up with a way to use it grammatically. Generally, it's ending up with [noun].
Grammar Geek Ending up with [noun] It's awkard, I think
Really!?Emotion: surprise

I think I've heard such expression as 'He ended up with the idea that...' quite often.

Is it awkward??
Sorry - badly punctuated sentence. It should be "ended up with [noun]." I meant that my contrived example was awkward. My apologies for the lack of clarity - I'm going to edit if I can to fix it.
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