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Lois: Kara Kent.
I'm your cousin's friend Lois whose jeans you've borrowed
on more than one occasion.
Is this a metaphore of some kind or not?

Kara: Right. Lois.

Lois: I know you've got amnesia.
You must, if your type is jaiIhouse chic. What's going on?

Kara: FinIey's just a busboy. That's aII.

Lois: Great. This doesn't exactIy Iook Iike overtime. He imprisoned them in a cage.
How did we end up here? Tell me what happened with you?

Kara: About a month ago, I Iost my memory.
I wandered off the streets (she stopped wanderind?)and into a diner
where I met a waitress.
She gave me her couch, (havened her?) got me my job. Everyone at the diner
took me in Iike famiIy. The staff were like a family to her?
Comments  
MadhulkLois: Kara Kent.
I'm your cousin's friend Lois whose jeans you've borrowed
on more than one occasion. Is this a metaphore of some kind or not? I don't think so. When you're speaking to an old acquaintance who has amnesia, it's natural to mention something you have in common - a past experience which might ring a bell.

Kara: Right. Lois.

Lois: I know you've got amnesia.
You must, if your type is jaiIhouse chic. What's going on?

Kara: FinIey's just a busboy. That's aII.

Lois: Great. This doesn't exactIy Iook Iike overtime. He imprisoned them in a cage.
How did we end up here? Tell me what happened with you? Right. Fill me in. The choice of "we" needs some prior context to explain. (Like when the Doctor says, "So why are we in the hospital this morning?")

Kara: About a month ago, I Iost my memory.
I wandered off the streets (she stopped wanderind?)and into a diner "Wandered in" is the common expression. "Wandered in off the street(s)" implies previously wandering on the streets, and then wandering into [some place]. "Wandered off the streets and into [a place]" is just a bastardized version.
where I met a waitress.
She gave me her couch, (havened her?) got me my job. Everyone at the diner Yes. - let me sleep on her couch.
took me in Iike famiIy. The staff were like a family to her? Right.
Thanks, Avangi!
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Just one more question on this one.
Lois: Kara Kent.
I'm your cousin's friend Lois whose jeans you've borrowed
on more than one occasion.

Kara has borrowed her cousin's jeans or Lois'?
Cousin's friend = Lois. That's whose jeans she borrowed. I'm assuming Clark is her cousin. I assume she didn't borrow HIS jeans.
Thanks, Barbara! I assumed it was Clark's jeans
because maybe he gave her his mother's jeans.
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MadhulkI'm your cousin's friend Lois whose jeans you've borrowed on more than one occasion.
I may be wrong on this, but I have a feeling that in addition to GG's logical reason for whose jeans these are, there's also a grammatical reason.

I'm the person who loves you.

I'm Bob's friend[,] who loves you.

There's no way this could be taken to mean, "Bob loves you."

With or without the comma, the antecedent of "who" must be a noun, or gerund, or gerundive phrase.

I think "Bob's" is an adjective. (Right?)

I agree that if you use the other possessive style, there might be some ambiguity:

I'm a friend of Bob, who loves you. (ambiguous)

I'm a friend of your cousin, whose jeans you've borrowed. (ambiguous)

I'm Lois, a friend of your cousin, whose jeans you've borrowed on more than one occasion. (ambiguous)

As an aside, does anyone know if "I'm a friend of your cousin's" is considered acceptable by any authorities?