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For many travelers, charter vacations often turn out to cost considerably more than they originally seemed.
(A) they originally seemed
(B) they originally seem to

i have been advised that the first version is better than the second.
I have always been confronted with problems with similar type of sentences, when the ending seem to be incomplete(seemingly incomplete) but in real they are flawless.

wat exactly is the key behind getting a perfect solution to such problems.
Would be loooking for ward for a comprehensive explanation.
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Hi,

For many travelers, charter vacations often turn out to cost considerably more than they originally seemed.
(A) they originally seemed
(B) they originally seem to


For the above example, I'd say . . . than they originally seemed to.

However, I'd say He was not the true friend that he originally seemed. (ie without any 'to').

As you can see, the two sentence 'structures' are a little bit different.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
In your sentence, there is still ellipsis is both endings A and B. The complete ending is "...they originally seemed to cost."

Seem is a linking verb, but one with some idiosyncracies. The following is from the American Heritage Dictionary.
Seem, a linking verb, is followed by an adjective (not by an adverb) in constructions such as This one seems different; These seem good. In the present tense, seem is often followed by the present infinitive (He seems to enjoy his job) or perfect infinitive (seems to have changed his mind); in the past tense, it is usually followed by the present infinitive (seemed to find the experience stimulating). The constructions cannot (or can't) seem plus infinitive is common in speech and informal writing; I can't seem to locate it. Its use, especially in writing on a higher level, is sometimes objected to on the ground of illogicality, however. The following, as an example in writing, is acceptable to 51 per cent of the Usage Panel: He could never seem to consolidate his early gains. Alternative constructions, retaining seem, are do not seem able, seem to be unable, and seem unable.
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.