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I would love to know what the grammar rule is here.
For example:
I want to know what his name is.
She wants to see where the puppies are.
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Anonymous I would love to know what the grammar rule is here. For example: I want to know what his name is.She wants to see where the puppies are.
These are good examples of indirect questions. The clause following the verb has a question.

I want to know what his name is. What is his name? I want to know.
She wants to see where the puppies are. Where are the puppies? She wants to see (that place).

In questions, the subject and verb are in a different order than in normal sentences.
In indirect questions, the subject and verb are in the normal order. That is why sentences with indirect questions can end in a verb.
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It's the normal rule. When the subject of the verb is singular, we use 'is'. When it's plural, we use 'are'.
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Comments  
AnonymousI want to know what his name is.
You can make sentences by combining an A phrase with a B phrase.

A
I want to know / I don't know / I wonder / I'd like to find out / I'll have to guess / Do you know ...? / I've forgotten / I can never remember / I really should be able to tell you / Nobody knows / I'll ask / You probably know better than I do

B
... who he is.
... who they are.
... who the supervisor is.
... what his name is.
... what her phone number is.
... where the concert is.
... where those tables are.
... how he is.
... how much those shirts are.
... how expensive it is.
... how serious his condition is.

Note the question words that begin these phrases. who, what, where, how.

CJ
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Being issued by one of the regulatory bodies over accounting, the standard provides guidance over leases, and re-defines what a lease is

Is this correct? Can this sentence end with "are"?

"I look forward to continuing my education...or touching base with colleagues to see what their thoughts are."

car scarf 849Is this correct? Can this sentence end with "are"?

Yes and yes. That's the only correct way you can end that sentence.

CJ

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Is it grammatically correct to use "are" at the end of a sentence when reponding to someone?

Like, "Yes, all listed people are."

anonymousIs it grammatically correct to use "are" at the end of a sentence ...

Yes.

CJ

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