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Hi everbody,

Could anyone explain the meaning of "engative verbs" in English Grammar, and give some examples, please?

Any'll be much appreciated. Thank in advance.
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YulysessHi everbody,

Could anyone explain the meaning of "engative verbs" in English Grammar, and give some examples, please?

Any'll be much appreciated. Thank in advance.
'Engative' is a new term for me. I have no idea. If it's a typo and you mean 'negative', I'm not sure what that is, either. Are you talking about verbs with a negative feeling associated with them, such as 'hate', 'fear', 'dislike'?
"Ergative," perhaps?
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Hi Philip,

I don't know exactly what they are. They could be the verbs you offered, perhaps. When I googled the phrase, I found a title like"A Study of Engative Verbs in English." on a site, but all Japanese, I couldn't understand even a word.

Maybe some Japanese friends check them up, and inform us. If they, much appreciated.Thanks again.

Hello

Some verbs can be used as both a transitive verb and an intransitive verb. If the object of the transitive of a verb can be the subject of its intransitive use, such a verb is called "ergative verb". For example, "move" is an ergative verb. We can say "John moved the stone" as well as "The stone moved". Another example is "break". We can say "John broke the glass" as well as "The glass broke". Other examples are : alter, balance, beat, begin, bend, bleed, boil, burn, burst, change, circulate, close, commence, dash, decrease, increase, diminish, drop, dry, embark, end, explode, fade, fill, form, freeze, gather, grow, harden, improve, increase, issue, melt, open, pass, roll, separate, shake, shine, shiver, shoot, slip, spread, start, stir, stop, split, spread, start, tear, thaw, thicken, turn, twist, upset, etc.. It is said there are about 600 ergative verbs in English. Most of them are those used to describe either (1) movement of a thing or (2) change of the state of a thing.

paco

[PS] The page you linked tells nothing about the ergative verb. It is a page explaining the educational curricula of that school.
Yulysess

Hi Philip,

I don't know exactly what they are. They could be the verbs you offered, perhaps. When I googled the phrase, I found a title like"A Study of Engative Verbs in English." on a site, but all Japanese, I couldn't understand even a word.

Maybe some Japanese friends check them up, and inform us. If they, much appreciated.Thanks again.Bir şey değil.

Cevaplar ben de bekliyorum.
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Paco2004Hello

Some verbs can be used as both a transitive verb and an intransitive verb. It is said there are about 600 ergative verbs in English. Most of them are those used to describe either (1) movement of a thing or (2) change of the state of a thing.

paco

[PS] The page you linked tells nothing about the ergative verb. It is a page explaining the educational curricula of that school.
Thanks, Paco, for the information. I've always known that certain verbs can be used transitively or in-, but I'd never heard the term for them.
Hello Paco,

Thanks for your interest. I know "ergative verbs" and their functions already. But the phrase I'm trying to be informed not "ergative" but "engative", that is, not "r" but "n".

There is a study title on the page I linked such as " A Study on Engative Verbs in English". Any knowledge about them, thanks.
I googled "engative verb" and all the examples were clearly misprints for "negative verb". I also tried dictionary.com and it does not recognise "engative".
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