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I know news headlines usually ignore the rules of grammar for the sake of compactness and spiciness. But is it okay to ignore the sense of the tense altogether? In the below headlines, I think, 'break' and 'defeat' stand for no tense at all. Or, perhaps it's just the rustiness of my English which is making the understanding elude me. I said 'understanding elude me' (I hope it's correct), I have used 'elude' in indefinite sense because tense is already known from the context.

It wouldn't have make the headlines less compact or spicy if they had used 'breaks' and 'defeats'. What do you say on this?

Headlines:
England break Bangladesh resolve.
England defeat Australia.
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Comments  
Headlines are often written in the present tense to give them more impact.

England break Bangladesh resolve.
England defeat Australia.

The "error" is not in tense but in number.

I believe what happens here is the sports writers think of "England" as the collective team, hence plural.

Sometimes they say silly things like "the Englands beat the Australias."

(Hmm, "beat" is the same present and past. Bad example! "The Englands defeat the Australias.")
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Avangi
The "error" is not in tense but in number.

I believe what happens here is the sports writers think of "England" as the collective team, hence plural.

In BrE this is common and is not seen as an error.
Avangi
Sometimes they say silly things like "the Englands beat the Australias."

Never heard that one!
Hi, Wordy,

I agree. It's not an error. I put it in quotes because the OP felt it was an error, and Dave was approaching it as a tense problem. I should have been more clear. (just lazy)

Ditto the Englands and the Australias. It's an American thing. I just used bad examples. I've never heard those specifically either. Emotion: embarrassed
Jackson6612 I think, 'break' and 'defeat' stand for no tense at all. Or, perhaps it's just the rustiness of my English which is making the understanding elude me. I said 'understanding elude me' (I hope it's correct), I have used 'elude' in indefinite sense because tense is already known from the context.

It wouldn't have make the headlines less compact or spicy if they had used 'breaks' and 'defeats'. What do you say on this? Hi, Jackson,

We use "indefinite" in referring to the article "a/an" as opposed to the "definite article, "the."

We use other terms when we refer to a verb which has no tense (a non-finite form).
Sometimes they have the same form; sometimes they don't.
The infinitive: to elude

The base form, or bare infinitive: elude
The present participle, or gerund: eluding
The past participle: eluded

TENSES:
simple past tense: eluded "The team eluded defeat." "The teams eluded the press."

simple present tense (3rd person singular) eludes "The team eludes defeat."
(all other persons and numbers) elude "The teams elude the press." "I elude the press."

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Avangi
I agree. It's not an error. I put it in quotes because the OP felt it was an error, and Dave was approaching it as a tense problem. I should have been more clear. (just lazy)

Ditto the Englands and the Australias. It's an American thing. I just used bad examples. I've never heard those specifically either.

Sorry Avangi, I misunderstood you.
AvangiThe "error" is not in tense but in number.
Yes, you are correct. In BrE 'England breaks Bangladesh resolve' is a correct version because here England is a singular noun standing for English cricket team. Perhaps 'break' version would also do, I don't know.
Hi, MrWordy,

No worries. I shouldn't be so careless.
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