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'When the Boat Comes In' and 'Close the Coalhouse Door' in Geordieland.

I loved that theme song. It always sounded to me like "When the Boot goes in".

Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org For an e-mail address, see my web page.
'When the Boat Comes In' and 'Close the Coalhouse Door' in Geordieland.

I loved that theme song. It always sounded to me like "When the Boot goes in".

Nothing like it. "Boat" has two syllables, "boot" has only one.
Ian
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
wrote:

The accent those people used is now out-of-date. If there ... now speak with a variety of accents, with regional variations.

Indeed, and the educated accent of the 1950's, say, to the extent that there was a single accent, is wildly ... change over a decade, and could distinguish an educated thirty-year old in 2000 from a similar educated thirty-year-old in 1990.

I was an educated 32 year old in 1990. Does this help?

DC
Peter wrote on Mon, 12 Apr 2010 11:19:46 +0100:

The accent those people used is now out-of-date. If there ... now speak with a variety of accents, with regional variations.

Regional variations have been acceptable even in Southern Britain for quite a long time. An educated Scottish accent is no disadvantage and neither was a Lancashire or Yorkshire accent (not dialect.) Southerners were not stupid, "Where there's muck, there's brass!"

I didn't mean to bring up regional differences or past job discrimination, or Scottish or Welsh folk or others who don't talk with the accent I'm referring to.
I'm only asking about those who do talk that way, and if their accent has existed for a long time, and how long. Okay, I agree that, for example, my accent may well be like no American in 1850 either, but though there are plenty differences, I think there are as many or more similarities, and that any changes derived naturally from earlier pronunciations. By naturally I mean I guess without conscious effort by those whose pronunciation differed from their parents.

The image my source gave me was that in England about that time, there was some sort of large disconnect, where a new accent became poplular and people made a point to speak that way, in order to appear either educated, or upper-class, or something good. In a way that I have never heard of happening elsewhere.
I did have a friend from rural Illinois who said warsh instead of wash. AFter he went the U. of Penn. and then became a lawyer in NYC, whether he tried to touch up his accent or not, I really don't know, but if he did, he would have been getting rid of a regional, rural pronunciatin in favor of the majority pronunciation. Similarly with abandoning "ain't" and lots of other changes someone might make. I'm not counting moving to the majority pronunciation. I'm asking about moving to a new, minority pronunciation. Does anyone know if that happened?

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
In
Regional variations have been acceptable even in Southern Britain for ... dialect.) Southerners were not stupid, "Where there's muck, there's brass!"

It all depends on the regional accent. Scots - apart from the totally unintelligible extremes (like broad Glaswegian) - has ... have become more-or-less acceptable, but it would still certainly be unwise to go for a job interview speaking 'broad regional'.

Unless, of course, it was for a job in a Call Centre, where it seems to be a prerequisite.

Ray
UK
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I've heard that the current educated English accent is only ... give me a website to convince someone who says no?

Why not just ask that someone for an example of any country where the prestige accent has managed to stay unchanged for more than 100 years? I doubt that he'll find any.

I doubt such an argument would work with him. He's say that I"m the one who made a claim and I should give evidence of it, that he's not an accent expert and his not knowing something doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
(I was half-tempted to cross-post this to the linguists, but we all know by now what happens then.)

I don't know but I'm afraid to find out!

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
Unless, of course, it was for a job in a Call Centre, where it seems to be a prerequisite.

True. Especially true if you consider 'Indian' to be a region.
Ian
Ian wrote on Mon, 12 Apr 2010 20:20:21 +0100:
Unless, of course, it was for a job in a Call Centre, where it seems to be a prerequisite.

True. Especially true if you consider 'Indian' to be a region.

70 million Indians speak English of one sort or other so it certainly becalled a regional accent. I'll admit that many speak very intelligible English but there are also a lot of dialect words and a remarkable amount of variation at call centers. Let me be honest, I've had a lot of good advice and assistance from people who have a hint of Indian accent.

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland
Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not
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Peter wrote on Mon, 12 Apr 2010 11:19:46 +0100:

The accent those people used is now out-of-date. If there ... now speak with a variety of accents, with regional variations.

Regional variations have been acceptable even in Southern Britain for quite a long time. An educated Scottish accent is no disadvantage and neither was a Lancashire or Yorkshire accent (not dialect.) Southerners were not stupid, "Where there's muck, there's brass!"

When the Beeb opened a TV station in Norwich in the late 50s, one of the newsreaders had a Norfolk accent. He was soon removed because of that. Graham
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