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Miss! Me Miss! Yes Miss. http://www.turnipnet.com/radio/unclemac.wav Intro; signature tune; then Uncle Mac introducing a song "...let's ... played records requested by children and gave the names and addresses of the children, in some cases the full address.

That was wonderful. Took me right back.

Rob Bannister
I loved that theme song. It always sounded to me like "When the Boot goes in".

Nothing like it. "Boat" has two syllables, "boot" has only one.

Huh? Are we talking about the same programme? Geordie "boat" does not sound quite like "boot", but it only has one syllable - a pure vowel, not a glide - more or less the same as German "Boot".

Rob Bannister
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I've heard that the current educated English accent is only ... used and maybe Basil Rathbone and PMs. =A0Is this true?

Consult appropriate experts on language e.g. David Crystal..

Or the specialist on this, John C. Wells. His book /The Accents of English/ has more on this than you or I want to know. Section 3 is "Developments and Processes" and subsection 3.2 (almost 30 pages) is "British Prestige Innovations". It's searchable at Amazon.

I once heard a recording of Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree (1852-1917) reading the "To be or not to be" speech. The "o" as in "nobler" sounded like but here it is, with other recordings of speeches from / Hamlet/ by Barrymore, Forbes-Robertson, and Gielgud!

http://www.bl.uk/treasures/shakespeare/playhamlet.html

Jerry Friedman wonders why Firefox's spearchucker flags "searchable". In the 21st century, yet.
Huh? Are we talking about the same programme? Geordie "boat" does not sound quite like "boot", but it only has one syllable - a pure vowel, not a glide - more or less the same as German "Boot".

Haddaway, man. Yuh divven't knaa whatt yer taakin' aboot. A pure vowel? You've obviously never listened to "Larn Yersel Geordie"!
First item on the list.
(Sorry, I can't find any YouTube recordings.)
Geordie vowels are exactly the same as in normal English, except that they tend to be suffixed by an "uh" sound. Hence the two syllables. In "When the Boat Comes In", mebbies Alex Glasgow waz just tryin' tuh sing posh.

Ian
Ian wrote on Tue, 13 Apr 2010 08:39:09 +0100:
Huh? Are we talking about the same programme? Geordie "boat" ... glide - more or less the same as German "Boot".

Haddaway, man. Yuh divven't knaa whatt yer taakin' aboot. A pure vowel? You've obviously never listened to "Larn Yersel Geordie"! ... sound. Hence the two syllables. In "When the Boat Comes In", mebbies Alex Glasgow waz just tryin' tuh sing posh.

I have to agree. I spent the WWII years in the town of Blyth near Newcastle and I can still sing "The Blaydon Races", which is replete with those double nasalized vowels. Just hear the sounds of the title and the pronunciation of "road" in "Gannin alang the Scotswood Road".

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland
Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not
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I have to agree. I spent the WWII years in the town of Blyth near Newcastle and I can still ... nasalized vowels. Just hear the sounds of the title and the pronunciation of "road" in "Gannin alang the Scotswood Road".

When I was at university in Durham one of the locals pronounced "bacon" as "byeeakin" - y as in yet, ee as in see, and a as in about. I think it was in reference to bacon butties. I hadn't heard of any kind of butties before, and it sounded to me exactly like "boeties" "little brothers" in Afrikaans.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
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I've heard that the current educated English accent is only about 150 years old. The one David Niven used ... this true? I've looked but iddn't find. Perhaps, can you give me a website to convince someone who says no?

I know that Wikipedia is sometimes viewed with scorn and contempt, but the WIKI article on what is generally known as 'received pronunciation' (RP), AKA the Queens English, BBC English, Oxford English (meaning Oxford University - not the town) is very good.
If someone is taught to speak English as a foreign language, they'll be taught to speak RP - just as someone learning other languages would be taught to speak in the 'standard' tongue. You'd be a bit miffed in you discovered that after years of study, you spoke French in a regional dialect such as Provencal!
But in the UK today, RP is very toned down as it's seen as 'affected' - 'put on', snobby' you'd be unlikely to hear a TV presenter talking RP - even the Queen has toned down her RP accent over the last 50 years, as can be noted by listening to her earlier Christmas broadcasts.

It's becoming much harder to discern native English speakers origins from their accent, but that said, there are notable differences between the north and south of England in everyday speech. For example, in the north it's 'last, fast, past', but in the south, pronounced 'lasrt farst parst' - certainly by people who consider themselves well spoken.

We live in the North of England, but have three grandaughters who live in London and have a French mother. They're perfectly bi-lingual, and speak French with a haughty Parisian accent and English with a 'posh' Home Counties accent. When we visit, we have to be on our guard and remember to try to 'talk posh' so they don't pick up what is considered to be bad habits.
When they visit us and hear the local North Humberside accent, they think it's a huge joke to go home and mimic it. Coca-Cola is pronounced kerka kerla, smoke is smerk, nine in narn, five is farve, and so on.

The effects of TV, pop music, films, social and geograhpical mobilty is tending to water down regional accents, which is rather a shame. My wife originated from Liverpool, but has difficulty understanding a 'scouse' (Merseyside) accent. Much easier to understand the Dutch speaking English than a Scot. (Unless one is Scottish of course:-)

David,
Nr Hull,
NE coast of England
I once heard a recording of Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree (1852-1917) reading the "To be or not to be" speech. The "o" as in "nobler" sounded like but here it is, with other recordings of speeches from / Hamlet/ by Barrymore, Forbes-Robertson, and Gielgud! http://www.bl.uk/treasures/shakespeare/playhamlet.html

There's not much that stands out there, but it sounds just faintly different. If I had to guess I'd say "posh Scottish background". I note from WP that he was educated in Germany - I don't know if that had any effect on his speech.

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