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Do you want an honest review of your pronunciation? You can record your voice here, and we'll tell you what we think. Reply to this post, and click the link 'RECORD YOUR VOICE' above the editor. Then say this: English is a complex language, it's just a popular tool that I can use to help others understand me. If I keep trying and use it as much as possible, I'll do just fine! Englishforums is the best site in the world Don't be afraid; language is only a tool to communicate thought . The requirement is that you be understood by your target audience. If you're doing that, you're doing fine! Exotic accents are welcome , take your time and good luck!...
 
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Please post step plus questions.
 
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Is the "g"-sound in "suggest" pronounced or not? I read that in American English 'suggest' is usually said as /seg'dshest/, while in British English it's pronounced /se'dshest/. How do you say it?
 
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execption of reflexive pronoun
 
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I'm watching the video Could you explain me some points: From 0.41 till 0.48 And I got used to that so I just figured that was where he was coming from and then he goes. - You know, I kind of like (Mr) Orange! At 1.02 and I kind of enjoyed that Is my transcript accurate? And if so, what is the meaning of the phrase "kind of" or "kinda" in this context?
By MAlexteechr  
 
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I cannot understand what are they saying in video, please help. link: From 0.23 until 0.53. Speech about Marilyn Monroe. Could you correct my transcript? Why are they laughing? My version is as follows: I told him a story one time about when I was a little boy and I, my mom and dad were at the drive-in theater and it was the first movie I'd ever been to and it was a Marilyn Monroe movie I don't know which one it was, but I've never seen a movie before. The movie starts off and then Marilyn Monroe came on my dad seated turned around he could feel me slide was like three or four sliding up and (0:41) I just got on his shoulder and went like this [???] became a strong Thanks
 
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Hi can you please watch this video [link] because I can't catch what Jimmy Fallon is saying at the beginning of the video. All I could get was "I'm so glad to see you.........." I've replace the words I can't catch with dots. Thank you. xx
 
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hey!! I've been learning English for about 10 years now and I've never lived in an English speaking country. Most of my friends tell me I sound very American and could easily pass for a native speaker, but then again English isn't their first language either. So what is the truth?? here's a voice clip: [link] Thanks in advance :-)
 
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should cups have an apostrophe
 
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Hello, I heard people pronounce the indefinite article "a" in two different ways. One is - what I consider the standard way - pronounced like the first letter of e.g. "accomplishment" (the phonetic symbol for this is an upside-down "e" but I can't type this here) and the other is pronounced like the first letter of the alphabet [ey]. However, the second pronounciation is not always used but only used in some cases. I could not figure out yet which these cases are. Can you tell me about these two ways of pronouncing "a" and when they are used? Regards, Paul
 
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I'm from South Korea and I'm having upcoming job interviews which will be done in English. Please evaluate my english pronunciation & accent! Thanks guys [link]
 
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whats the difference between the coast and the ocean
 
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I am a Chinese collage student. While I was referring to dictionary.com for word pronunciation and syllable, sometimes, I could encounter some weird-like words' pronunciations(e.g. nihilism , [link] ). In this case, the syllable the web provide is ni·hil·ism, but the audio pronounce the web provide sounds like nihi·li·sm. I guess it might be the diversity existing in different language determine this difference. Also, it might just be the misunderstanding of English syllable constitution. Thanks!
 
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what part of speech is the word two?
 
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I have presentation on monday. [link]
 
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Hi Would you say that the writer of this novel (reading the passage in this clip) has a faint American accent? Thanks, Tom
 
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Hey there. My name is Marcelo and I'm from Brazil. I'm trying to study English syllable division and I'd like to know if you native speakers study it when at school. If you do so, How do you learn it? Isn't it related to the sounds of the words? Especially vowel sounds? How do you recognize them before dividing?
 
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I wont be free passed 5pm ...what does it means
 
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The differences between skill and qualification
 
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how to pronounce it
 
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The video starts with this: Woman: Oh, you're back. Man: ____________________ . Woman: What was your name again? What did the man say in the blank? 
 
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How would you read out the following numbers? 2,684 ft? Would you say 26 hundred and 84 or two thousand six hundred and eighty four feet? How about any other four digit number? I believe the four digit numbers with only the two first digits significant are read by first reading the first two digits followed by hundred e.g. 8,400 is read 84-hundred. But how do you read four digit numbers with three or four significant digits e.g. 5,280 or 7,435? How about 1,415,926,535? Would you read it as 1 billion, 4 hundred and 15 million, 9 hundred and 26 thousand, 5 hundred and 35? My English teacher (he’s English) taught that the British pronounce these and 's, but Americans do not. I’m, however, not convinced since I have heard Americans say things like: the year 2-thousand and 9. Finally, the decimal numbers? Would you read the number 0.8320671 as ( oh/naught) point eight three two oh/zero six seven one? My English teacher says the digits after the decimal point are read separately, but once again I’m not completely convinced.
 
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stop thinking about future or stop thinking in future
 
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Which is correct and is "ahead" correct in this context? I will post picture of/from the week ahead. Thanks
 
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We learn that we should break a word, that contains a double consonant, up between the two consonants. e.g. bot / tle, however this is not how we say it. We say bo-ttle not bot-tle. This is widespread, but it doesn't accurately indicate how the word should be pronounced. It is also very misleading to non-native English speakers. Can anyone tell me the rational behind this rule? The only reason I can think of is we do this to ensure that the first vowel is short (closed syllable). If this is indeed the case, it is still misleading and it would be better to teach students that the double consonants make the preceding vowel short. Thank you
 
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improve English speaking
 
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