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Is it true that English comma is used more often in the US than in the UK?

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TinaMr

Is it true that English comma is used more often in the US than in the UK?

I don't think anybody has ever researched this question.

On the face of it, however, it seems to me that the population of the US is much larger than the population of the UK, so there is probably a lot more written material in the US than in the UK, and that means that, in all probability, there are more commas in the US than in the UK.

But I may have got the wrong end of the stick because I don't know what you mean by "English comma". What is an English comma? I assumed you meant just "comma".

CJ

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Some may recognize it as "Oxford comma", but I've not heard of "English comma".

Technically speaking, it's called "serial/series comma", and can be used before "and/or".

Yes, it's not common in UK-based English, and the British don't use it unless lack of it causes misinterpretation for the reader.

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Comments  

Thank you, Califjim for your reply. No, I don't mean commas in general. I mean an English comma - the one that comes before an "and". Ex. I like fruits: apples, bananas, and pears. English comma - a comma after "bananas" in this case.

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TinaMrEnglish comma

Ah. Oxford comma.

Yes, we use that a lot in the U.S. We think that lists are clearer that way.

CJ