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What does the below sentence means?

Co-working spaces haven’t always been as popular as they are now.

"Until the early part of the previous decade, few might’ve given the concept the time of day. Today we happily pool a private cab ride and give up our precious garage space for others to rent."

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Literally, if you "won't give someone the time of day", it means that you refuse to greet them with a time-of-day-related greeting such as "Good morning" or "Good evening". Commonly, as in your sentence, the expression is used figuratively, to mean that you reject or dismiss someone/something, and won't pay any attention to it/them.

"give up our precious garage space for others to rent" = allow others to use our precious garage space in return for a payment of rent. "precious" is slightly ironic.

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not to give someone (or something) the time of day is an idiom that means to ignore something as unimportant, trivial, and not worth any amount time to consider.

The literal meaning of giving someone the time of day is telling someone what time it is.

— What time is it?
— It's one o'clock.

In the little exchange above, someone gave another person the time of day.

gray olive 661few might’ve given the concept the time of day.

Only a very small number of people would have considered co-working spaces an idea that was worth thinking about or talking about.

gray olive 661give up our precious garage space for others to rent.

We don't use the space in our garages for ourselves. Instead we rent that space to other people.

(Others may have a better explanation of this. I am not personally aware of the practice.)

CJ

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Comments  
GPYit means that you refuse to greet them with a time-of-day-related greeting such as "Good morning" or "Good evening"

If that's the real etymology of the expression, I've had it wrong my entire life.

CJ

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CalifJim
GPYit means that you refuse to greet them with a time-of-day-related greeting such as "Good morning" or "Good evening"

If that's the real etymology of the expression, I've had it wrong my entire life.

I think that the meaning "not tell someone what time it is, if they ask" may be a reinterpretation. There is a explanation at https://scribalterror.blogs.com/scribal_terror/2008/03/the-time-of-day.html that the expression goes back to the old use of "Good time of day" as a time-of-day salutation. However, I can't actually vouch for the accuracy of this.

Oddly, M-W says that the expression is "chiefly US" (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/give%20%28someone%29%20the%20time%20of%20day ), which is not my perception at all. I wonder if perhaps it could have arisen independently in the US, or, as I say, reinterpreted.

Interesting. And I found this, below. Apparently, these people hadn't heard of Shakespeare.

Ignore someone, refuse to pay the slightest attention to someone, as in He's tried to be friendly but she won't give him the time of day. This expression, first recorded in 1864, alludes to refusing even to answer the question, “What time is it?”

https://www.dictionary.com/browse/not-give-someone-the-time-of-day

CJ

Also, there is the expression "pass the time of day", which is about exchanging greetings or pleasantries, not literally concerning what time it is. In my mind, I somewhat connect "not give someone the time of day" with "pass the time of day", in terms of the use of "time of day".

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