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Hello, Please tell me the meaning of the following.

a) ``Pure scientists were as susceptible to pure corn as lesser beings."

b) ``Take umbrage for your spleen."

c) ``Spend your Holidays in High Dudgeon."

Thanks.
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Anonymousa) ``Pure scientists were as susceptible to pure corn as lesser beings."
They would get equally drunk on pure corn liquor.
(Are you sure this is an idiom?)

b) ``Take umbrage for your spleen."
. . . . Take offense at your vile outburst.

c) ``Spend your Holidays in High Dudgeon."

???

Hello, thanks for the first two. I am not entirely sure whether they are, but this is what I was told from someone translating a very old Cambridge book in science.

As to c) ``High Dudgeon" means ``feeling great resentment at something." So, what is it to ``Spend your Holiday in High Dudgeon" ?
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Hi,

I feel these sentences are wrtten to be amusing.

Please tell me the meaning of the following.

a) ``Pure scientists were as susceptible to pure corn as lesser beings."

This is not really very funny, but it seems to be playing with two different meanings of the word 'pure'.

b) ``Take umbrage for your spleen."

'Take umbrage' is a fixed kind of phrase.

The sentence seems to be imitating sentences like 'Take aspirin for your headache'.

c) ``Spend your Holidays in High Dudgeon."

'High dudgeon' is a fixed phrase.

Here, I think the writer is pretending that 'High Dudgeon' is the name of an English town or village. Some of them do in fact have very odd names.

So, is it possible that your source could involve humour?

Clive
Hello, No, I don't think the author is meaning to be cheeky. These are from a really old Cambridge science book.

I more or less think ``Take umbrage" means to become upset or angered at something, and ``High Dudgeon" is a feeling of great resentment at something. So, I am thinking the responses may be along those lines, and I think the first response is.

Anyway, let me know.

Thanks.
Clive a) ``Pure scientists were as susceptible to pure corn as lesser beings."
This is not really very funny, I thought it was the funniest of the three! Emotion: big smile

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AnonymousHello, No, I don't think the author is meaning to be cheeky.
I agree with Clive. In my opinion (b) and (c) are clearly meant to be humorous sentences, as he describes, though I must admit I do not really understand (a).
Avangi
Clive a) ``Pure scientists were as susceptible to pure corn as lesser beings."

This is not really very funny, I thought it was the funniest of the three!

Could you explain what you think it means and why it's funny? I don't see it.

I asked the translator to photocopy the page, and this is the first time I am reading it. It is from the book The Visible College, concerning the lives of five socialist Cambridge professors.

I see now humour is involved.

Page 24

``Soon the boundaries of their workplaces and homes began to blur rather badly. Not content with discussing physics from nine to five, young physicists from the Cavendish forrmed an after-hours discussion circle in the early twenties to keep themselves informed, stimulated and amused. Over at the Dunn Lab Cambridge biochemists were showing themselves to be equally obsessive about their own science (and each other). They even produced a humorous annual between 1923 and 1931. Called Brighter Biochemistry, it provided the Dunn's inmates with a chance to prove that pure scientists were as susceptible to pure corn as lesser beings. ('Take Umbrage for your Spleen', 'Spend your Holidays in High Dudgeon', etc.) Apart from inspiring these highly organized escapades, Cambridge laboratories lent themselves to more private and personal use, including sexual encounters."

Let me know and thanks in advance.
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