Forwarded messages from "Mohan Sevak"

( From: "Mohan Sevak"
( Subject: English language poised to lose its dominance ( Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2004 20:25:04 -0800 (PST)
For Mentally Slave People in Bharat who are perpetuating slavery in Bharat
Shame in Bharat on those Media people who give cast of Hindi films in English
Shame in Bharat on those Media people who give cast of Hindi TV programs Shame in Bharat on those Media people

Shame in Bharat on those Media people who use Urdu and English words in Hindi
Shame in Bharat on those commercial people who do not write Hindi on the labels of their products.
English language poised to lose its dominance
Mandarin set to become new 'must learn' tongue
http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article Type1&call pageid=971358637177&c=Article&cid=1077837011395

Problems await English-only speakers: Expert
Randolph E. Schmid
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The world faces a future of people speaking more than one language, with English no longer seen as likely to become dominant, a British language expert says in an analysis.
"English is likely to remain one of the world's most important languages for the foreseeable future, but its future is more problematic and complex than most people appreciate," language researcher David Graddol said.
He sees English as likely to become the "first among equals" rather than having the global field to itself.

"Monolingual speakers of any variety of English American or British will experience increasing
difficulty in employment and political life, and are likely to become bewildered by many aspects of society and culture around them," he said.
The share of the world's population that speaks English as a native language is falling, Graddol reports in a paper in today's issue of the Journal Science.
The idea of English becoming the world language to the exclusion of others "is past its sell-by date," Graddol said. Instead, its major contribution will be in creating new generations of bilingual and multilingual speakers, he reports.
A multilingual population is already the case in much of the world and is becoming more common in the United States. The Census Bureau reported last year that nearly one American in five speaks a language other than English at home, with Spanish leading, and Chinese growing fast.

And that linguistic diversity, in turn, has helped spark calls to make English the official language of the United States.
Yale linguist Stephen Anderson noted multilingualism is "more or less the natural state. In most of the world multilingualism is the normal condition of people."

"The notion that English shouldn't, needn't and probably won't displace local languages seems natural to me," he said. While it is important to learn English, politicians and educators need to realize that doesn't mean
abandoning the native language, he added.
Graddol, of the British consulting and publishing
business The English Company, anticipates a world where the share of people who are native English speakers slips from 9 per cent in the mid-twentieth century to 5 per cent in 2050.
As of 1995, he reports, English was the second most- common native tongue in the world, trailing only Chinese.
By 2050, he said, Chinese will continue its predominance, with Hindi-Urdu of India and Arabic climbing past
English, and Spanish nearly equal to it.
Swarthmore College linguist K. David Harrison noted, however, that "the global share of English is much larger if you count second-language speakers, and will continue to rise, even as the proportion of native speakers declines."
Harrison disputed listing Arabic as a top three language "because varieties of Arabic spoken in say, Egypt and Morocco are mutually incomprehensible."
Even as it grows as a second language, English may still not ever be the most widely spoken language in the world, according to Graddol, since so many people are native Chinese speakers and many more are learning it as a second language.
English has become the dominant language of science, with an estimated 80 per cent to 90 per cent of papers in scientific journals written in English, notes Scott Montgomery in a separate paper in the same issue of Science. That's up from about 60 per cent in the 1980s.

"There is a distinct consciousness in many countries, both developed and developing, about this dominance of English,"
Montgomery said in a telephone interview. "There is some evidence of resistance to it, a desire to change it." For example, he said, in the early years of the Internet it was dominated by sites in English, but in recent years there has been a proliferation of non-English sites, especially Spanish, German, French and Japanese.
Nonetheless, English is strong as a second language, and teaching it has become a growth industry, said
Montgomery, a Seattle-based geologist and energy
consultant.
Graddol noted, though, that employers in parts of Asia are already looking beyond English. "In the next decade the new 'must learn' language is likely to be Mandarin."

"The world's language system, having evolved over
centuries, has reached a point of crisis and is rapidly restructuring," Graddol said. In this process as many as
90 per cent of the 6,000 or so languages spoken aroundthe world may be doomed to extinction, he estimated.

He does have words of consolation for those who struggle to master the intricacies of other languages. "The expectation that someone should always aspire to native speaker competence when learning a foreign language is under challenge."
- - -
JIS KO NA NIJ BHASHA TATHA NIJ DESH PAR ABHIMAN HAI

WAH NAR NAHIN NAR PASU NIRA HAIN AUR MRITAK SAMAN HAIN.

Maithili sharan
Hindi must be brought to its pristine and pure form. There should be a big reform movement to eradicate all Persian, URDU and ARABIC WORDS from daily use and also from books, literatures, educational syllabus, novels and Indian films and serials. Indian film and television have done a great injustice in promoting Urdu, Persian and Arabic as well as English words. HINDI FILMS COTAINS ONLY 30% HINDI WORDS! ALL THE BEST FOR THE EFFORTS
CHANAKYA
End of forwarded messages from "Mohan Sevak"

*

English is Munglish

*
Jai Maharaj
http://www.mantra.com/jai
Om Shanti
Panchaang for 8 Phalgun 5104, Saturday, February 28, 2004:

Shubhanu Nama Samvatsare Uttarayane Moksh Ritau
Kumbh Mase Shukl Pakshe Manta Vasara Yuktayam
Rohini-Mrgashir Nakshatr Vishakumbh Yog
Bav-Balav Karan Ashtami-Navami Yam Tithau
Hindu Holocaust Museum
http://www.mantra.com/holocaust
Hindu life, principles, spirituality and philosophy http://www.hindu.org
http://www.hindunet.org
The truth about Islam and Muslims
http://www.flex.com/~jai/satyamevajayate
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English language "poised" to lose its dominance?
So it's been preparing, undergone rigorous training and now, after many exercises, it is at last "poised" to achieve the long-sought goal of losing its dominance?

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
English language "poised" to lose its dominance? So it's been preparing, undergone rigorous training and now, after many exercises, it is at last "poised" to achieve the long-sought goal of losing its dominance?

Is there really a verb "to poise" meaning to prepare, to undergo rigorous training to achieve a goal?
The meanings I find are different, and include "to be held in suspension; hover" (AHD). None of them quite define it as "to be in a position where XX is likely to occur" but it's routine US English. Maybe one of those journalistic conventions.
Checking MasterTexts.com:
The hand, poised like doom above him, hesitated, and the man spoke...
London Jack/ White Fang/
"That is poised like a white hawk over one of the Cape Verde Islands.".
Hardy Thomas/A Pair of Blue Eyes
with one impulse every individual in the great concourse of nobles lifted a coronet and poised it over his or her head and paused in that attitude.
Twain Mark/The Prince and the Pauper/
standing with a spoonful of the leaf poised over the pot. ... Bronte Emily/Wuthering Heights/
On the general Web, there are 14,800 hits for "poised to strike". Mostly viruses, labor disputes, lawsuits, armies, and a few snakes and other animals.
At other times this handsome bird stands motionless, poised ready to strike...
In comparison, only 838 "poised to lose," but it's still there.
Best Donna Richoux
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
is it time to relearn sanskrit?
is it time to relearn sanskrit?

That's why you're here. Why wouldn't it be time to relearn sanskrit?

Rr.
is it time to relearn sanskrit?

Simply continue to use it.
Jai Maharaj
http://www.mantra.com/jai
Om Shanti
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
is it time to relearn sanskrit?

Simply continue to use it.

With technology, maybe these 'language wars' may become obsolete. I read in a book (The Age of Spiritual Machines by Ray Kurzweil) that soon(2006?), it will be feasible to have realtime translation on phones and other hand held devices.
Then language can be relegated to its intended purpose - communication ; and not be used for indulging in exclusivity, superiority etc.

Lord, make me a channel of thy peace !
With technology, maybe these 'language wars' may become obsolete. I read in a book (The Age of Spiritual Machines by ... can be relegated to its intended purpose - communication ; and not be used for indulging in exclusivity, superiority etc.

"Sanskrit grammar reflects the wondrous capacity of the human brain, which till today no other country has been able to produce except India."
- Sir Monier-Williams
"The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin and more exquisitely refined than either: yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs, and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philosopher could examine them all without believing them to have sprung from some common source which perhaps no longer exists..."
- Sir William Jones
"Sanskrit is the mother of all the European languages and is the most suitable language for the computer software. There is at least one language, Sanskrit, which for the duration of almost 1000 years was a living spoken
language with a considerable literature of its own. Besides works of literary value, there was a long
philosophical and grammatical tradition that has
continued to exist with undiminished vigor until the present century. Among the accomplishments of the
grammarians can be reckoned a method for paraphrasing Sanskrit in a manner that is identical not only in essence but in form with current work in Artificial Intelligence."
- Forbes Magazine, July, 1987
A couple of quotations:
"Sanskrit, the world's oldest spiritual language is the only unambiguous spoken language on the planet."
- NASA
"Sanskrit is constructed like geometry and follows a rigorous logic. It is theoretically possible to explain the meaning of the words according to the combined sense of the relative letters, syllables and roots. Sanskrit has no meanings by connotations and consequently does not age. Panini's language is in no way different from that of Hindu scholars conferring in Sanskrit today."
- Alain Danielou
Jai Maharaj
http://www.mantra.com/jai
Om Shanti
"Sanskrit grammar reflects the wondrous capacity of the human brain, which till today no other country has been able to produce except India." - Sir Monier-Williams

Why do you deliberately misquote Sir Monier-Williams, Johnny boya? The quote should read "Panini's grammar.." Give credit where it is due, maggot!
The most fascinating non-Western grammatical tradition, and the most germinal and independent - is that of India, which dates back at least two and one-half millennia and which culminates with the grammar of Panini whose date is usually given as being circa the 5th century BC. The Sanskrit grammar of Panini already comprises a fully formulated system, its author standing at the end of a long line of precursors of which sixty-four are named but whose works have entirely perished.

Panini himself uses the word 'Yavanani' which Katyayana explains as 'writing of the Yavanas' (i. e. Iaones or Greeks.) Although it is unlikely that Indian scholars could have come into first hand contact with Greek manuscripts before the invasion of Alexander in 327 BC, Panini could well have had contact with Greeks familiar with studies of rhetoric, since the Ionian Greeks had dealings with Persia from c. 540 BC, and many who were exiled settled in Persia well before 327 BC.

They must, however, have grown familiar with Greek ideas before a grammarian would make a rule as to how to form from Yavana, 'Greek, ' a derivative form meaning 'Greek writing. '
http://evans-experientialism.freewebspace.com/panininix.htm
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