Reading "My Name Is Michael Sibley" by John Bingham (1952), I ran across some terms I've seen before but never really understood.

In what sport would one be a member of the Fifteen? Can't be soccer, that's eleven. I thought it might be cricket, but that's apparently eleven as well.
Also, what is the Sixth Form? Some sort of honors class?

Do all public schools have Houses and a College, or just Eton? The school in the book is situated on the banks of the Avon is that meant to refer to some actual school, or is it fictional?
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Reading "My Name Is Michael Sibley" by John Bingham (1952), I ran across some terms I've seen before but never ... of the Fifteen? Can't be soccer, that's eleven. I thought it might be cricket, but that's apparently eleven as well.

You're thinking of how many players are on the field at one time. A school may require fifteen players to make up a team to provide substitutes so it could be football (soccer) or hurling. It's most likely a reference to rugby, though. International Rugby allows up to
15 players on the field. In Rugby Union rules each team has 15players on the field.
Reading "My Name Is Michael Sibley" by John Bingham (1952), I ran across some terms I've seen before but never ... on the banks of the Avon is that meant to refer to some actual school, or is it fictional?

Fifteen would be rugby, but I don't know whether it would be rugby union or rugby league.
The Sixth Form is the year after the Fifth :-) Assuming one goes to school at the age of 11, then that is the First Year. At 12 is the Second Year, etc etc. The Sixth Form is slightly different in that at 16 one goes into the Lower Sixth, and at 17 into the Upper Sixth. This term applies to all English schools, not only public schools. Sixth Form students are studying for A-levels.
My grammar school had Houses which were named after Cistercian monasteries (my school was also a convent). The local comprehensive also had Houses, as did my primary school, so I would imagine that most schools had them.

Dergikolik
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Reading "My Name Is Michael Sibley" by John Bingham (1952), ... meant torefer to some actual school, or is it fictional?

Fifteen would be rugby, but I don't know whether it would be rugby unionor rugby league.

Rugby Union, known in public schools simply as "football". Soccer was frowned on at my public school. Rugby League has 13 a side and is a another working-class game played in northern England, as far from public schools as you can get.
Alan
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that's school refer

It's now the only working-class game played in northern England, surely, where even Oldham Athletic's Boundary Park formerly a paradigmatic proletarian footy ground now prides itself on its "executive facilities".
Out with the Bovril; in with the Bollinger.

Ross Howard
Reading "My Name Is Michael Sibley" by John Bingham (1952), I ran across some terms I've seen before but never ... turn out with 20 or more players, including subs). Also, what is the Sixth Form? Some sort of honors class?

A "form" is one year's intake of pupils within a school. Because of the way that the English education system has long been organised, schools specialising in educating older children normally started with a youngest form of children aged around 11, the "First Form". As the children moved through their school years, they'd progress through the Second Form, Third Form, and so on, eventually arriving at the lofty heights of the Sixth Form. For reasons I've never quite understood, the Sixth Form is normally considered to span two years, often distinguished as the Lower and Upper Sixth (although "upper and lower" can also be used in other ways, such as to distinguish between the more and less able students in the same year - eg the "Lower Fourth").

The Sixth Form was (is, where it still exists) mostly pupils studying to go on to Higher Education such as University). It often has greater privileges and freedom than the years beneath it, reflecting the pupils' supposedly increasing maturity. Pupils in the Sixth Form normally have a degree of free or study time within their academic day, in addition to formal tuition, too, so they will probably have facilities that the other years lack (in a school with the space, pupils might have their own studies, for example; even my own school, within the state system, had a decent-sized "Sixth Form Common Room" with comfy chairs, a kettle for making hot drinks, and so forth).

Within the state sector, sixth forms are far less common within individual than they used to be, having been largely replaced by specialised establishments (sometimes still referred to as "Sixth Form Colleges", although the first two words are usually dropped nowadays - meaning that "going to college" has a rather different meaning to my kids than it had to me).
Do all public schools have Houses and a College, or just Eton?

Most schools (public or otherwise) divide their pupils into Houses by one name or another, even today; it's a useful mechanism when the school wants to set up a little group rivalry and bring peer-pressure into play (for sports events say, or by handing out merits and demerits for behaviour).
Cheers - Ian
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Reading "My Name Is Michael Sibley" by John Bingham (1952), I ran across some terms I've seen before but never ... of the Fifteen? Can't be soccer, that's eleven. I thought it might be cricket, but that's apparently eleven as well.

Rugby Union.
Also, what is the Sixth Form? Some sort of honors class?

The Sixth Form is for those pupils going on to do A levels. In my school (Malvern College) there were three Sixth Forms - 6a, 6b and 6c - though I can't now remember what they all signified. Practically no boys (it was a single sex school at that time) dropped out before the Sixth Form. Obaue - should Sixth Form be capitalised?
Do all public schools have Houses and a College, or just Eton? The school in the book is situated on the banks of the Avon is that meant to refer to some actual school, or is it fictional?

Our College consisted of ten houses, imaginitively titled House No. 1 ... House No. 9 and finally School House. They were 10 separate buildings wherein the boys ate, slept and did homework or prep (or Hall, as we called it for some reason). Lessons and other formal and informal teaching took place within the main college building(s).

It was a dreadful system and I utterly loathed it. I'd sooner bite my own leg off than send my own dear shining boys to such a filthy establishment.
Edward

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Reading "My Name Is Michael Sibley" by John Bingham (1952), ... what is the Sixth Form? Some sort of honors class?

A "form" is one year's intake of pupils within a school. Because of the way that the English education system ... nowadays - meaning that "going to college" has a rather different meaning to my kids than it had to me).

For completeness: I spent a term in what my grammar school was pleased to call the Seventh Form. Its purpose was to allow pupils to take Oxbridge Entrance examinations I don't know how widespread this practice is or was, though.
Matti
A "form" is one year's intake of pupils within a ... different meaning to my kids than it had to me).

For completeness: I spent a term in what my grammar school was pleased to call the Seventh Form. Its purpose was to allow pupils to take Oxbridge Entrance examinations I don't know how widespread this practice is or was, though.

For further completenesst, that was just called "doing Special Papers" at mine, a four-house, third-to-upper-sixth-form affair, staffed by a team of professionals ranging from the merely woefully inept to the certifiably barking mad i.e. a perfectly ordinary boys' grammar school.

Ross Howard
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