I am reading a book "Being English in Scotland". The author claims about English settlers that
"The language used to describe these settlers has been on occasion intemperate, and, at times, insulting. Amongst a lexicon of epithets discovered.. were: white settlers, interluopers, bonglies, guffies, cash crofters, '87 Crash refugees, Sassenachs, dropouts, and FEBs (*** English Bastards) (ibid.p.1)"
What I would like to know is, what kinds of pejoratives are used by BrE speakers about the Scots, especially the Scots settled down in England? I just need at few words and preferable a link or a reference to an issue about this if possible.
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I am reading a book "Being English in Scotland". The author claims about English settlers that "The language used to ... I just need at few words and preferable a link or a reference to an issue about this if possible.

1) Samuel Johnson's Dictionary (1755), from memory:

Oats: A grain, in England generally given to horses, which in Scotland supports the people.
2) The old characterisation of the four nations of Britain (works bothways!):
The Englishman is a self-made man who worships his Creator.

The Welshman prays on his knees on a Sunday, and preys on his fellow-men for the rest of the week.
The Irishman has no principles, and is prepared to die for them.

The Scotsman keeps the Sabbath, and everything else that he can lay his hands on.
I now expect a terrorist bomb any day.
With best wishes,
Peter.

Peter Young, (BrE), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004. (US equivalent: Attending Anesthesiologist) Now happily retired. Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
"Dr Peter Young" (Email Removed) skrev i meddelelsen
I am reading a book "Being English in Scotland". The ... or a reference to an issue about this if possible.

1) Samuel Johnson's Dictionary (1755), from memory: Oats: A grain, in England generally given to horses, which in Scotland supports ... the Sabbath, and everything else that he can lay his hands on. I now expect a terrorist bomb any day.

Thank you - I think this will contribute to the essay I am writing.
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I am reading a book "Being English in Scotland". The author claims about English settlers that "The language used to ... I just need at few words and preferable a link or a reference to an issue about this if possible.

I know this isn't what you are after, but having been brought up in London and still living in the South, I'm not aware of any slang terms used to refer to Scots (whether living down here or not) other than "Scots". The only Scots I know are nice people.
I'm only saying this because I wouldn't want anyone to get the false impression that the English have it in for or dislike the Scots (and I would like to think it works both ways.) Whlist I'm sure there are exceptions, they would be the exception and not the rule.

Brian Cryer
www.cryer.co.uk/brian
I am reading a book "Being English in Scotland". The ... or a reference to an issue about this if possible.

I know this isn't what you are after, but having been brought up in London and still living in the South, I'm not aware of any slang terms used to refer to Scots (whether living down here or not) other than "Scots".

There's "jocks" and the rhyming slang of "sweaty socks", but neither of those are particularly abusive.
I'm only saying this because I wouldn't want anyone to get the false impression that the English have it in ... think it works both ways.) Whlist I'm sure there are exceptions, they would be the exception and not the rule.

Now, the Welsh that's another matter entirely.

Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
"Brian Cryer" skrev i meddelelsen
I am reading a book "Being English in Scotland". The ... or a reference to an issue about this if possible.

I know this isn't what you are after, but having been brought up in London and still living in the ... think it works both ways.) Whlist I'm sure there are exceptions, they would be the exception and not the rule.

Thank you for your contribution.
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"HVS" (Email Removed) skrev i meddelelsen
On 11 May 2009, Brian Cryer wrote

Thank you for your contribution. It is very welcome here.
What I would like to know is, what kinds of pejoratives are used by BrE speakers about the Scots, especially ... I just need at few words and preferable a link or a reference to an issue about this if possible.

Not quite what you're looking for, but I remember quite vividly an incident from a visit to England around 1970. At a suburban railway station near London the announcer had a noticeable (but not especially thick) Scottish accent; on hearing one of the notices someone on the platform shouted "Speak white, will yer!" I don't suppose, however, that his reaction would have been any different to a Welsh or Irish voice, let alone (God forbid) an Indian or African one.

Odysseus
On 12 May 2009, mm wrote

That they blamed other Scots, rather than the English?

I think it was more that it was seen as an act of "those in charge" who were traitors ... Scots I've discussed it with) to have been by other Scots working with the hated English but not "conquered".

Surely it is the English who have been conquered (by stealth) by the Scots? After all, we British have a Scottish Prime Minister, and a Scottish Chancellor of the Exchequer. You don't get much more "We're in charge" than that.

Ian
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