English usage in the 2003 recap
http://londonelegance.com/aue/2003 /
This page lists some memorable, and not so memorable, moments in 2003 where English usage were in the spotlight..
Punctuation!! Who needs it?? Do we really care that the italic typeface was invented by a geezer called Aldus Manutius the Elder (1449-1515)?

"When I'm talking about when I'm talking about myself, and when he's talking about myself, all of us are talking about me."
"THE hyphen may be headed for extinction." That, say the editors of a new edition of the Oxford Dictionary of English, is the fate awaiting one of the standard resources of the language.
Chats during homework. Chats while watching TV. Text chats on the cell phone. Known by its acronym, IM, instant messaging is all about quick, concise written conversation - and that means shorthand. "LOL" instead of "laughing out loud." "BRB" instead of "Be right back." "L8R" instead of "Later."
The increasing rate of litigation means that there is a far higher chance that doctors will be asked in court to explain the exact meaning of NFN (Normal for Norfolk), FLK (Funny looking kid) or GROLIES (Guardian Reader Of Low Intelligence in Ethnic Skirt).
I'll wax etymologic for a moment. The origins of 'wax,' grow bigger or greater, increase, go way back to the Indo-European (3000-4000 B.C.) base 'woks-,' a variant of which has given English 'auction' (as the sale proceeds the price offered increases) and 'augment.'

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For lovers of English usage, there's great links here, but grab them while there still hot!
English learners should practice reading these articles allowed!

The Usenet newsgroup for English usage maintains a site at http://www.alt-usage-english.org . This site is a commercial-free zone dedicated to providing an Internet presence for the newsgroup.
Kind regards,
GJV
1 2 3 4 5
English learners should practice reading these articles allowed!

Aloud.
English learners should practice reading these articles allowed!

Aloud.

Much as I dislike the expression, I suppose it would be okay in this case for someone to say "Oy!"
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Aloud.

Much as I dislike the expression, I suppose it would be okay in this case for someone to say "Oy!"

Andrew gets the full "gevalt." I think the only person he ever finds funny is himself.

Bob Lieblich
I find him funny too
English learners should practice reading these articles allowed!

Aloud.

You caught one, Garry!
Happy Christmas and thanks for your nice and handy webpage.

Adrian
Aloud.

You caught one, Garry! Happy Christmas and thanks for your nice and handy webpage. Adrian

An' here's me thinking he was quoting something. So, why does he get Oy'ed?

Cheers, Sage
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Andrew gets the full "gevalt." I think the only person he ever finds funny is himself.

If gevalt means a kick in the ass, I agree. What does the word mean, if not that?

Charles Riggs
Email address: chriggs¦at¦eircom¦dot¦net
If gevalt means a kick in the ass, I agree. What does the word mean, if not that?

"Gvald" is the Yiddish word that the Yinglish "gevalt" comes from, I think. If I'm not mistaken, "gvald" means 'emergency'. (My Yiddish dictionary is in Pennsylvania and I am in Massachusetts at the moment, so I can't check this.)
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
If gevalt means a kick in the ass, I agree. What does the word mean, if not that?

"Gvald" is the Yiddish word that the Yinglish "gevalt" comes from, I think. If I'm not mistaken, "gvald" means 'emergency'. (My Yiddish dictionary is in Pennsylvania and I am in Massachusetts at the moment, so I can't check this.)

Well, in German "Gewalt" means violence, force, or violent force. I'd venture that it means the same in Yiddish and Yinglish.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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