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Hi , I wonder if you can answer my question - I recently wrote an English test and part of the test was a Cloze passage where you fill in the missing word .

A point was taken off for the following sentence "Edison's Inventions made people's lives more ____ " . I would like to know if filling in "simple" in the missing space is correct ? I know it is better English to use the word simpler instead of more simple but is this just convention or is there an actual english grammar rule forbidding the usage of this form . As far as i know in school i always learned that words with more than 2 syllables can get either a more or the addition -er except for a few exceptions such as beautiful or longer sylabble words "

Thanks
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I just don't understand the rampant use of 'more simpler'.

It's all over the map. 'Simpler' means 'more simple'. So why say 'more more-simple'?
AnonymousHi , I wonder if you can answer my question - I recently wrote an English test and part of the test was a Cloze passage where you fill in the missing word .

A point was taken off for the following sentence "Edison's Inventions made people's lives more ____ " . I would like to know if filling in "simple" in the missing space is correct ? I know it is better English to use the word simpler instead of more simple but is this just convention or is there an actual english grammar rule forbidding the usage of this form . As far as i know in school i always learned that words with more than 2 syllables can get either a more or the addition -er except for a few exceptions such as beautiful or longer sylabble words "

Thanks

It is my guess that the person writing the question wanted you to show that you understand the "rule" about '-er' vs 'more'. Therefore you should have inserted an adjective that obviously cannot take '-er', such as exciting, leisurely, etc.
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Hi, my point of question is about how to improve my TOEFL as keep score on grammar, and reading also oral question.

While I have two English class on general English, writing, and reading. after class I try to practice on the computer for Englsih test.

thanks
Philip
Anonymous
Hi , I wonder if you can answer my question - I recently wrote an English test and part of the test was a Cloze passage where you fill in the missing word .

A point was taken off for the following sentence "Edison's Inventions made people's lives more ____ " . I would like to know if filling in "simple" in the missing space is correct ? I know it is better English to use the word simpler instead of more simple but is this just convention or is there an actual english grammar rule forbidding the usage of this form . As far as i know in school i always learned that words with more than 2 syllables can get either a more or the addition -er except for a few exceptions such as beautiful or longer sylabble words "

Thanks

It is my guess that the person writing the question wanted you to show that you understand the "rule" about '-er' vs 'more'. Therefore you should have inserted an adjective that obviously cannot take '-er', such as exciting, leisurely, etc.
Hi

I'm looking up for the words from Christmas Crossword which mean

- something with small white berries that is put above the door

- These children go from house to house around Christmas

- a bush with leaves and red berries

Please help me now! Thanks
1. mistletoe

2. carol singers

3. holly
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
In general, words of one syllable use the -er and -est forms (longer, driest). Words of more than two syllables attach more or most (more interesting, most rapidly). Two syllable words often allow the choice of either (more simple, simpler) [source, Perrin, Smith, Corder Handbook of Current English, 3rd edition, p.134]. However, I prefer the simpler use myself, and the dictionary lists -er and -est as the proper adjective forms for both simple and ready.

Which form to use with two syllables may largely depend on the sound. A knowledgeable linguist could probably shed light on this issue.