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Hello

1. Is it correct to use "enroll" or "sign up" when you talk about college?

For exampe:

I want te enroll to (for?) (a? the?) college.

I want to sign up for (to?) (a? the?) college.

I'm not sure about the articles as well.

2. Is it correct to use "enroll" or "sign up" when you talk about the gym?

For example:

I want to enroll to the gym.

I want to sign up (to? for?) the gym.

Or is "join the gym" the only possible solution?

Thanks.
Comments  
Hi,

enroll - A fomal word. Sounds like you are talking about something important.

sign up - Informal. Sounds like something casual.

1. Is it correct to use "enroll" or "sign up" when you talk about college?

I'd say 'enroll', because college is important.

But where I live, you have to apply to a college, and wait until they accept you. So 'apply' is a more common term than 'enroll'.



For exampe:



You enroll in something.

I want te enroll to (for?) (a? the?) college.

I want to sign up for (to?) (a? the?) college.

Say 'college' with no article, or else use the name of a particular college.



I'm not sure about the articles as well.



2. Is it correct to use "enroll" or "sign up" when you talk about the gym?

'Enroll' is too formal. Say 'sign-up' or 'join'. I usually hear 'join'.

For example:



I want to enroll to the gym.

I want to sign up (to? for?) the gym. Perhaps 'at' is more common.



Or is "join the gym" the only possible solution?

Best wishes, Clive

Thanks.

Is
"I want to enroll in college" correct then?

Longman dictionary says:

"enroll for/on - British English
I decided to enrol for 'Art for Beginners'."

Does it mean that enroll for/on is correct only in British English?>

Thanks.
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Hi,

Is

"I want to enroll in college" correct then? Yes.

Longman dictionary says:

"enroll for/on - British English Are you sure it doesn't say 'for/in'? 'On' does not make sense in this context.

I decided to enrol for 'Art for Beginners'."

Does it mean that enroll for/on is correct only in British English?> That's what the dictionary is saying. Personally, I wasn't aware of that.

Clive
Hi, this is the link.

When we say that we want to start classes/course/programme etc.

Do we say:
I want to enroll for classes/course/programme.

And when we say about the place:

I want to enroll in college/school?
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tmn111I want to enroll to the gym.

I want to sign up (to? for?) the gym.

Or is "join the gym" the only possible solution?
To my ear "enroll" is too formal for use in this context. I would say "join the gym" or "join a gym" depending on the situation.

In any case (in the vast majority of cases) you "enroll in" and you "sign up for"