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Hello.

"Use the definite article with plural countable nouns or uncountable nouns to refer to the entire category in existence or to a specific subset of the category as defined by the context.
When particles of matter meet with and annihilate their corresponding particles of antimatter, the energy produced comes out purely in the form of gamma rays. [The author used the definite article with the uncountable noun energy to indicate that he was referring to only the subset of energy that is produced when these particles collide.]"

Could you give me some examples with plural countable nouns and uncountable nouns to refer to the entire category in existence ?

I would be grateful for your help.
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JesusenglandWhen particles of matter meet with and annihilate their corresponding particles of antimatter, the energy produced comes out purely in the form of gamma rays.
As I analyze your sentence, the article is due to the relative clause that follows the energy: When particles of matter meet with and annihilate their corresponding particles of antimatter, the energy [that/which is] produced comes out purely in the form of gamma rays.

Even though English is the promised language of exceptions and inconsistency, this use of the definite article is very common before all kinds of nouns:

These are the books that I bought yesterday.
I didn't like the film shown to us.
He didn't drink the water that was given to him.
I don't like the Japan that he describes in his book.

CB
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Thanks for your help but Could you give me some examples with uncountable nouns to refer to the entire category in existence (Not specific) ?

Thanks.
JesusenglandThanks for your help but Could you give me some examples with uncountable nouns to refer to the entire category in existence (Not specific) ?

I already did that: He didn't drink the water that was given to him.

You can use any uncountable noun you like instead of water: He didn't like the advice that was given to him.

CB