+0
Hi, thanks for helping me again. Just wondering if we say:

I'm entitled to annual leave, or I'm entitled for annual leave? In what situations we would use to or for?

Also, do we use gerund to to-infinitive after entitled to? Is "to" here a preposition?

Thanks,
Peter
+0
One is entitled to (+ noun or infinitive) or eligible for (+ noun).
+0
It should be "entitled to" in this case and in almost every other case. Valid uses of "entitled for" are rare; the only possible example I can think of at the moment is "entitled for (period of time)" meaning "entitled (to something) for (period of time)" where the "to something" is omitted because it is obvious from context.

In your example "to" is a preposition and the pattern is "entitled to" + noun. It is theoretically possible for that noun to be a gerund, but the only natural examples I can think of are compound nouns, as in "I am entitled to swimming lessons".

The other pattern is "entitled to" + verb infinitive, as in "I'm entitled to receive sick pay."
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Comments  
I am entitled to or entitled for a share of the profit. which is correct?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.

Which is the correct answer.

I am entitled to or entitled for my house?

panda towel 21 I am entitled to or entitled for a share of the profit. which is correct?

See the above answers.

panda towel 21 I am entitled to or entitled for a share of the profit. which is correct?

See the above answers.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thanks so much