The class registered its approval with body language that was the equivalent of silent applause.
Does the latter part of the sentence indicate that the body language was so large that it can be paraphrased with silent applause?
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K wrote on 20 Apr 2004:
The class registered its approval with body language that was the equivalent of silent applause. Does the latter part of the sentence indicate that the body language was so large that it can be paraphrased with silent applause?

Body language can't be "paraphrased"; sign language can, though. If everyone in the class made the same gesture or a group of gestures that all indicated approval, that body language could be said to be "the equivalent of silent applause".

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, ehziuh htiw rehpycrebyc ecalper.
Body language can't be "paraphrased"; sign language can, though. If everyone in the class made the same gesture or a group of gestures that all indicated approval, that body language could be said to be "the equivalent of silent applause".

If so, can I paraphrase the latter part of the sentence into "with that body language that was identical in effect to silent applause"?
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The class registered its approval with body language that was the equivalent of silent applause. Does the latter part of the sentence indicate that the body language was so large that it can be paraphrased with silent applause?

When my wife was teaching she trained her classes in 'silent cheers'. Everything associated with a cheer was done - both arms straight up in the air, fists clenched, bending and straightening arms, shoulders pitching and rolling, mouths opening and closing, head wagging side to side. The only thing not permitted was to make a noise.
I'd be interested to know where your quote comes from.
John Dean
Oxford
K wrote on 20 Apr 2004:
Body language can't be "paraphrased"; sign language can, though. If ... could be said to be "the equivalent of silent applause".

If so, can I paraphrase the latter part of the sentence into "with that body language that was identical in effect to silent applause"?

"with body language that was identical in effect to silent applause" is okay, yes.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, ehziuh htiw rehpycrebyc ecalper.
The class registered its approval with body language that was the equivalent of silent applause. Does the latter part of the sentence indicate that the body language was so large that it can be paraphrased with silent applause?

Consider an audience slumped back in their chairs with expressionless faces. Their body language is a silent equivalent of disapproval. Then, consider the audience leaning forward with animated faces and an air of subdued excitement. That is the silent equivalent of applause. Applause is approval, and body language can signal approval.
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The class registered its approval with body language that was ... so large that it can be paraphrased with silent applause?

Consider an audience slumped back in their chairs with expressionless faces. Their body language is a silent equivalent of disapproval. ... air of subdued excitement. That is the silent equivalent of applause. Applause is approval, and body language can signal approval.

Is hand clapping body language?
Irwell wrote on 20 Apr 2004:
Is hand clapping body language?

That's noise, but one hand clapping, now, that's body language.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, ehziuh htiw rehpycrebyc ecalper.
Consider an audience slumped back in their chairs with expressionless ... applause. Applause is approval, and body language can signal approval.

Is hand clapping body language?

You somehow missed the limitation presented by "silent"?
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