Back in March I posted a link to a survey of ESL volunteers as part of my Master's graduate project. Thank you to everyone who participated in the survey.
The finished ESL Volunteer Guide can be viewed here: http://writing.colostate.edu/references/teaching/esl/

A cover report discussing the survey results can be viewed here: http://lamar.colostate.edu/~greentea/grad/Lim Grad Report.doc

-Kristina Lim, MA TESL/TEFL
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Back in March I posted a link to a survey of ESL volunteers as part of my Master's graduate project. ... here: http://writing.colostate.edu/references/teaching/esl/ A cover report discussing the survey results can be viewed here: http://lamar.colostate.edu/~greentea/grad/Lim Grad Report.doc -Kristina Lim, MA TESL/TEFL

Kristina, I'm astonished volunteers are used to teach ESL in the USA. Surely this is local government getting work done on the cheap? And don't professional and qualified teachers get upset about their professionalism being undermined? I'm all for people volunteering, contributing to their community and broadening their own skill sets, but the already underpaid and overworked folk who teach community ESOL in the UK (I've worked in the sector, and my wife still does) would take a very old-fashioned view of being under-cut by under-qualified volunteers; and like the US, the UK has an overwhealming need for community ESOL teaching. I'm still reading your report, and it's really interesting - apologies if I'm jumping the gun here.
DC
Kristina, I'm astonished volunteers are used to teach ESL in the USA.

Volunteers are cheaper than paid teachers, although ESL teaching pay is so low in many areas that the difference may not be significant.
Surely this is local government getting work done on the cheap?

Local government and other organizations.
And don't professional and qualified teachers get upset about their professionalism being undermined?

Probably, but since they aren't being used in this case, anyway, who cares?
Teaching English isn't rocket science. While excellent teachers are rare, almost anyone who is a native or fluent speaker of English can teach the language in a pinch, often well enough to get the job done.
I'm all for people volunteering, contributing to their community and broadening their own skill sets, but the already underpaid and ... the sector, and my wife still does) would take a very old-fashioned view of being under-cut by under-qualified volunteers ...

Maybe they need to face the modern reality that ESL teaching just isn't worth that much money. There are plenty of people who can do it well enough to get the job done. That's why pay is so low or nonexistent.
... and like the US, the UK has an overwhealming need for community ESOL teaching.

If demand exceeds supplie, wages will rise. The fact that they are so low in most areas implies that supply exceeds demand. Of course, in some countries, ESL teachers are in strong demand, but in the UK or the US, just about everyone is a potential ESL teacher.

Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
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I'm sure the English teachers reading this newsgroup will be thrilled to bit by your contempt for our profession. It only goes to confirm my opinion of the value of your contributions here.
Einde O'Callaghan
"Mxsmanic" (Email Removed) schrieb im Newsbeitrag

I don't think so. I am Mexican, my Spanish is fluet and educated, if I may say so, and sometimes I've been unable to explain Spanish grammar structures to beginner Spanish students. Mind you, I have studied English and German as foreign languages, so I know what to study a foreign language is.

IMO, "to get the job done" as a language teacher implies profesional knowledge/work.
Irma.
Einde O'Callaghan > misc.education.language.english in <
I'm sure the English teachers reading this newsgroup will be thrilled to bit by your contempt for our profession.

I didn't know that expression. Does it mean "very excited"? (in an ironic sense, in this case)

"if the speed of light were sixty miles per hour, life would be youthful, fast, and dark."
http://www.cyberslayer.co.uk/jokes/joke0587.html
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Einde O'Callaghan > misc.education.language.english in <[/nq]
I'm sure the English teachers reading this newsgroup will be thrilled to bit by your contempt for our profession.

I didn't know that expression. Does it mean "very excited"? (in an ironic sense, in this case)

It does, except that it should be "thrilled to bits". I think Einde made a typo, but it may be his dialect. He'll tell us, I'm sure.

Ray.
Einde O'Callaghan > misc.education.language.english in <[/nq]
I'm sure the English teachers reading this newsgroup will be thrilled to bit by your contempt for our profession.

I didn't know that expression. Does it mean "very excited"? (in an ironic sense, in this case)

It should be "thrilled to bits" and your interpretation is correct.

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Einde O'Callaghan > misc.education.language.english in
It does, except that it should be "thrilled to bits". I think Einde made a typo, but it may be his dialect. He'll tell us, I'm sure.

A typo - I was just on my way out to work - to teach English - when I read Manicmix's contribution and nearly choked on my cornflakes. Hence my rather rapid (and incomplete) reply.
I suspect that Manicmix has a similar contemptuous attitude to the poor students entrusted to his care - I seem to recall that he claims to be an English teacher.
Regrds, Einde O'Callaghan
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