I need a pair of fresh eyes. I would appreciate it if someone could proofread behind me and add suggestions. Thanks!!

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The question has been debated many times whether or not Christopher Columbus should be celebrated and acknowledged for his accomplishments. There has been 500 years of controversy and praise. Was he a great explorer and discoverer, a hero for America? Was he a slave trader who took what he wanted regardless of the consequences? Or was he simply a man, looking to fulfill his dreams?

When Christopher Columbus set out on his expedition after many meetings with the King and Queen of Spain, he was excited to be on this wonderful journey. His main goal was to find the most direct route to open up trade with the Western world. Columbus was a merchant and seaman. He was in his element and was hoping for the best of both worlds. When he sights land for the first time he explores the land. They find houses abandoned, the natives had fled when they saw the strangers come ashore. When he comes upon the houses he treats them with respect. He says to treat the native’s belongings with respect and to take anything, “I ordered that nothing which they had left should be taken, not even the value of a pin” (Columbus 121). In the beginning he was very considerate of the natives.

While exploring the islands and charting the islands, his search for precious metals are returning slim findings. Among his “talks” with the natives, they tell him of great treasures and metals but they are always on the next island or further away. The communication between Columbus and the natives is limited because of language barriers. Columbus derives a plan that will be beneficial to him as he plans return trips to this newly discovered world “I then sent ashore to one of the houses, and took seven women and three children: this I did that the Indians might tolerate their captivity better with their company,…Besides, these women will be a great help to us in acquiring their language, which is the same throughout all these countries” (Columbus 127-128). To take the freedom away from these simple people was selfish of Columbus. This is what I think played a great part in his downfall from hero to villain. He treated these peoples as objects and therefore lost his humanitarian vision for one of commerce.

Then we take a look at Columbus as a man. Was he simply out to better himself and seek fame and glory for his findings? Columbus wrote down important facts for not only historical purpose but to present evidence that he “achieved” his goals to his benefactors, the King and Queen of Spain. Columbus was foremost a businessman, he was out to make money and a name for himself. In his writing’s he builds a case for returning yet again to the West in hope’s of finding even greater riches and more undiscovered lands.

Does a man have the power to destroy nations? Do we honor a man who enslaved free people? Do we blame him for thousands of deaths because of disease, war and struggle? From the journal entries, Columbus appears to be an intelligent, strong individual. He was doing what men of his time and profession were all doing, and that was exploring and creating new avenues of commerce. He was intent on his journey and made decisions to better his cause. Whether or not we can put the name of villain on him is undecided. Throughout history the Strong (Columbus) vs. Weak (the natives of the land) has always been nature’s pattern for survival. Columbus’ decisions made him famous for his discoveries and explorations. For over five hundred years people have debated the subject and five hundred years from now, the debate will still be there.
Just a few comments. Hope they help!

The question has been debated many times (punctuation) whether or not Christopher Columbus should be celebrated and acknowledged for his accomplishments. There has been 500 years of controversy and praise. Was he a great explorer and discoverer, a hero for America? Was he a slave trader who took what he wanted regardless of the consequences? Or was he simply a man, looking to fulfill his dreams?

When Christopher Columbus set out on his expedition after many meetings with the King and Queen of Spain, he was excited (sounds off in a formal essay. You weren't there...) to be on this wonderful journey. His main goal was to find the most direct route to open up trade with the Western (isn't the Western World Europe?) world. Columbus was a merchant and seaman. He was in his element and was hoping for the best of both worlds (What do you mean?). When he sights (tense) land for the first time he explores the land. They find houses abandoned, the natives had fled when they saw the strangers come ashore. When he comes upon the houses he treats them (them meaning houses?) with respect. He says (something missing here) to treat the native’s belongings with respect and to take anything, “I ordered that nothing which they had left should be taken, not even the value of a pin” (Columbus 121). In the beginning he was very considerate of the natives.

While exploring the islands and (no need to repeat) charting the islands, his search for precious metals are returning slim findings. Among his “talks” with the natives, they tell him of great treasures and metals but they are always on the next island or further away. The communication between Columbus and the natives is limited because of language barriers. Columbus derives a plan that will (going back to present tense again...) be beneficial to him as he plans return trips to this newly discovered world “I then sent ashore to one of the houses, and took seven women and three children: this I did that the Indians might tolerate their captivity better with their company,…Besides, these women will be a great help to us in acquiring their language, which is the same throughout all these countries” (Columbus 127-128). To take the freedom away from these simple people was selfish of Columbus. This is what I think played a great part in his downfall (we haven't come to that conclusion yet)from hero to villain. He treated these peoples as objects and therefore lost his humanitarian vision for one of commerce.

Then we take a look at Columbus as a man. Was he simply out to better himself and seek fame and glory for his findings? Columbus wrote down important facts for not only historical purpose but to present evidence that he “achieved” his goals to his benefactors, the King and Queen of Spain. Columbus was foremost a businessman, he was out to make money and a name for himself. In his writing’s he builds (going back to present tense again) a case for returning yet again to the West in hope’s of finding even greater riches and more undiscovered lands.

Does a man have the power to destroy nations? Do we honor a man who enslaved free people? Do we blame him for thousands of deaths because of disease, war and struggle? From the journal entries, Columbus appears to be an intelligent, strong individual. He was doing what men of his time and profession were all doing, and that was exploring and creating new avenues of commerce. He was intent on his journey and made decisions to better his cause. Whether or not we can put the name of villain on him is undecided. Throughout history the Strong (Columbus) vs. Weak (the natives of the land) has always been nature’s pattern for survival (this is assuming that the natives were weak. Did you establish that?). Columbus’ decisions made him famous for his discoveries and explorations. For over five hundred years people have debated the subject and five hundred years from now, the debate will still be there. (good ending)
i need to know if he was a hero or a villian for my project? What were the effects of the columbian exchange?
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I think your essay is really good. So good that anyone who read it would wish that your essay was thier. I think you should keep up the good work.Great Emotion: thinking


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Ashley