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What's the difference? Sometimes I see that it comes with "the" but sometimes doesn't

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The continent is "Europe", not "the Europe."

There are seven continents, Europe is one. My ancestors immigrated from Europe.

Please post an example of "the Europe" as a noun phrase, where "Europe" is not modifying another noun.

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kenny1999

What's the difference? Sometimes I see that it comes with "the" but sometimes doesn't

1) "the" doesn't go with "Europe"; it goes with the noun that follows:

the Europe book, the Europe illusion, the Europe dilemma, the Europe strategy, the Europe question

There may be quite a few modifiers before the noun, and 'Europe' is just one of them. Here's a book title:

The Europe and Soviet Union Agricultural Situation

2) "the" indicates a special aspect of Europe defined by a following of-phrase:

the Europe of nations, the Europe of football, the Europe of the 1990s, the Europe of my heart, the Europe of festivals

3) "the" indicates a special aspect of Europe with another kind of phrase or clause:

the Europe that was lost

CJ

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Comments  

Did you mean "the Europe" is wrong if used as an noun? I just remember incorrectly that there is "the Europe"?

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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kenny1999

Did you mean "the Europe" is wrong if used as an noun? I just remember incorrectly that there is "the Europe"?

'Europe' is a noun, but it's only used with 'the' in certain cases. (See my post above.)

CJ

How about united states? should it come with or without "the"?

kenny1999

How about united states? should it come with or without "the"?

with

CJ

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