I would greatly appreciate any help, comment, and suggestions (topic, content, organization, spelling, grammar etc.)

Thanks while looking forward to hearing from you,
hadeka

JUNK MUSIC

- “First, let me state clearly that I like heavy metal music – some. I also like some Classical, some Country and Western, some Jazz, Electronica, Latin Pop, etc. I like all sorts of music. However, I think heavy metal music is not a good kind of music.”
- “How you can say any art is good or bad? You cannot evaluate art. Isn't music just notes and chords, etc.? How can notes be "bad" or "good"?

I know music is not neutral. How could I explain it to my friend? I picked up my guitar and played a D minor chord. Then, I asked him if it was a good D minor chord or a bad D minor chord. After some loud laughter, he said, “That’s exactly what I meant. Notes are just a matter of the frequency of the sound wave. There's no such thing as good or evil music.” Then I told him that a D minor chord is not music! It is a building block of music - and there's a big difference.

I said, "Take the English language, for example. If I write the letter “e,” is that a good “e” or a bad “e”? Neither. As a building block of the English language, it is a neutral entity. However, I can put that letter in conjunction with other letters and compose something like: I hate you, or I love you. With using notes, chords, melody, lyrics, harmony, tempo etc., you can compose something good or bad. Music is a very powerful tool which can be used for both good and evil.”

There are similarities between rhetoric and music; music is a form of communication. Music and rhetoric share a basic situation; there is always a maker of music, a hearer of music, and the music—much like the speaker, the audience, and the speech. Music is a language of emotions without words; it communicates regardless of language barriers. So, it is possible to evaluate music with its effects in terms of “communication.”

Music and the arts are what make life worth living. Music is used everywhere to create attitudes, stir emotions, set moods and affect our behavior. Restaurants play it to relax us as we dine; advertisers use it to prompt our buying mood; in films and TV, it can elate or make us cry. Music can even seem to turn the clock back when we hear a tune from long ago.

My friend was persuaded that music is a tool and it isn’t just joyful sounds. However, the most important question in his mind was still unanswered. “Yes...music leaves lasting impressions on us all. Maybe we can evaluate music by comparing one piece of music with another in terms of effects and purposefulness of melody, lyrics, etc. But how can you say god or bad for a genre of music? If we are making judgement, I can say heavy metal music is popular. It is good, so it is bought. Classical music has never been so popular or widespread.”
First of all, popularity cannot be the criteria for judging the worth of an artwork. Most record buying consumers make the easy mistake of confusing popular and well-advertised music with what is truly good in music. Millions of records are sold not because of innate talent or creativity, but because they are heavily advertised. If a song is made popular only by hype, it will fade away in a couple of years. If it’s a song that is truly good, it will last forever. Going back even further, about 300 years ago, Johann Pachelbel who was an organist and composer, wrote a piece of music: “Canon in D Major.” Today, Pachelbel’s Canon is not only one of the most often played pieces of music from the Baroque era, its many variants have weaved their way into mainstream music. It is difficult to imagine any one of the songs by Britney Spears, The Backstreet Boys, Metallica, or Eminem, keeping their popularity for 30 years, let alone 300.
Secondly, I can say classical music, folk music, or musics which is used in music theraphy are good, because these kinds of music beneficial to well being and health. I’ve read several articles about effects of music. I showed them to my friend. Many scientific and medical studies have proved conclusively the tremendous effects of music upon the human physiology and anatomy.

The physiological and psychological effects of music as a healing art are well documented throughout the literature. Healing music is controlling our auditory environments, facilitating learning and enhancing our immune systems to improving memory, reducing pain, managing stress, designing creative time management and exercise programs. A study conducted at the University of California found that scores on memory tests of Alzheimer's patients greatly improved when listening to Mozart. The Mozart Effect is a well-known phenomenon that showed that participants who listened to Mozart performed better on spatial tasks.(Campbell 201-235)

Heavy metal music is believed to have psychological effects, but there is little definitive documentation on the subject. At the same time, the listeners and fans of heavy metal say that the music helps them deal with their problems. So, I didn’t say, “Heavy metal music is bad.” I didn’t know its dangerous and detrimental effects. But, after I saw Masaru Emoto’s experiments, I have changed my view. Now, I think heavy metal is bad.

Dr. Masaru Emoto, a Japanese researcher who is a graduate of the Yokohama Municipal University and the Open International University as a Doctor of Alternative Medicine, explains how he freezes different samples of water and then photographs their crystals in his book "The Message from Water." He is testing a variety of water samples from different sources and is investigating the effect of prayer, sound and words on the quality of water. Through repeatable experiments Dr. Emoto demonstrated that human thoughts and emotions can alter the molecular structure of water. Now, for the first time, there is physical evidence that the power of our thoughts can change the world within and around us.

Dr Emoto began to study the impact of altering water by various factors of vibration and consciousness. He studied water that had been altered by music - healing music, classical music, heavy metal music - and so forth. He placed distilled water in between two speakers and played one piece of music fully at normal volume. Then he froze the water. This experiment was repeated many times over with the same result. Classical music always produced beautiful crystals of slightly different colours (at right). Healing music, a Tibetan mantra and folk music also produced beautiful crystals.

Heavy metal music created distorted, formless, smudged image that looked like a crystal that had exploded into a thousand pieces(at left).
Our bodies are 70 % water, and that makes them excellent conductors for sound and vibration. We are not just hearing with our ears. And, Masaru Emoto’s work demonstrates that we are constantly being influenced by the sounds around. So what does this mean to us and our music preferences? The good news is that everyone can choose what music they listen to. Music is a tool to be used for our advantage. Whether that advantage is how to utilize our free time to its maximum effect or our work time to our benefit; we can be smart and use music effectively.

I want to complete with my heavy metal music fun friend’s words after our long debate on evaluating music: “Bad music can be compared to junk food; good only in small doses, not much there to keep you alive. Good music can be compared to real whole foods; it gives you lots of energy and power, and keeps you going for a long time. I have bad eating habbits and mostly eat junkfood, because I like them much more. It’s hard to change habbits, but, at least, when I’m thinking or studying, I can listen Mozart!”

Works Cited:
[1] Campbell, Don. Mozart Etkisi (The Mozart Effect). Istanbul: Kuraldisi Yayinlari, 2002.
What an interesting essay, Hadeka. I'll think about it and come back with some comments.

Two quick thoughts (I'll forget them if I don't write them down now):

a) What effect do you think the commercial recording of music will have? For instance, you mention that Britney and Eminem may not last very long; but will e.g. pensioners listen to them in 50 years' time, just as people today listen to jazz compilations of tracks by Bix Beiderbecke and the Original Dixieland Jazz Band? (A strange thought: tomorrow's pensioners, in an old people's home, communally singing tracks from Slim Shady...)

b) Where does modern orchestral music fit in? I'm amused sometimes by a friend of mine, who rants about 'discordant modern music', when he means e.g. Bartók's string quartets, which are getting on for 60-100 years old now.

MrP
Hi MrPedantic,

As a matter of fact, I don't have a deep knowledge of music. Maybe I'm a 21th century kind of teen. I'd listened and played generally popular music until two months ago. Last two months, I've started to listen some classical and sûfi music -healing musics. About your thoughts:

a) Interesting. (I don't even imagine myself listening The Slim Shady as a pensioner--I would prefer more relaxing musics and meaningful lyrics.) About popularity, I think physical appearance, prance on stage, and shows are what makes e.g Britney popular. Maybe these are the differences when comparing them with Jazz music. I can say (after your "pensioner example") Eminem or Britney's popularity will completely end when their generation is beginning to die out.

b) I newly discover classical music. I think, e.g. Bartók's string quartets demand enormous concentration from listeners. So, they maybe have little trouble winning older orchestral fans. But I think, modern orchestral music can be defined as good music.

I hope I've understood your questions right? Sorry about the skimpy answers (I'll be think about them), give my lack of background and knowledge.

Looking forward to hearing your comments,
hadeka
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Hello again hadeka

I am still thinking about the content (I am a slow thinker...), but here are some notes in the meantime on the grammar etc. To begin with, I've simply enclosed doubtful phrases in [...], in case you prefer to work out why I've bracketed them yourself:


I said, "Take the English language, for example. If I write the letter “e,” is that a good “e” or a bad “e”? Neither. As a building block of the English language, it is a neutral entity. However, I can put that letter [in conjunction with other letters] and compose something like: I hate you, or I love you. [With using] notes, chords, melody, lyrics, harmony, tempo etc., you can compose something good or bad. Music is a very powerful tool which can be used for both good and evil.”

There are similarities between rhetoric and music; music is a form of communication. Music and rhetoric share a basic situation; there is always a maker of music, a hearer of music, and [the music]—much like the speaker, the audience, and the speech. Music is a language of emotions without words; it communicates regardless of language barriers. So, it is possible to evaluate [music with its effects] in terms of “communication.”

Music and the arts are what make life worth living. Music is used everywhere to create attitudes, stir emotions, [set moods] and affect our behavior. Restaurants play it to relax us as we dine; advertisers use it to prompt our buying mood; in films and TV, it can elate or make us cry. Music can even seem to turn the clock back when we hear a tune from long ago.

My friend was persuaded that music is a tool and it isn’t just joyful sounds. However, the most important question in his mind was still unanswered. “Yes...music leaves lasting impressions on us all. Maybe we can evaluate music by comparing one piece of music with another in terms of effects and [purposefulness] of melody, lyrics, etc. [But how can you say god or bad for a genre of music?] [If we are making judgement,] I can say heavy metal music is popular. It is good, so [it is bought]. Classical music has never been so popular or widespread.”

First of all, popularity cannot be the [criteria] for judging the worth of an artwork. Most record buying consumers make the easy mistake of confusing popular and well-advertised music with what is truly good in music. Millions of records are sold not [because of innate talent or creativity {whose?}], but because they are heavily advertised. If a song is made popular only by hype, it will fade away in a couple of years. If it’s a song that is truly good, it will last forever. Going back even further, about 300 years ago, [Johann Pachelbel who was an organist and composer, wrote a piece of music:] “Canon in D Major.” Today, Pachelbel’s Canon is not only [one of the most often played] pieces of music from the Baroque era, its many variants have [weaved] their way into mainstream music. It is difficult to imagine [any one of the songs] by Britney Spears, The Backstreet Boys, Metallica, or Eminem, keeping their popularity for 30 years, let alone 300.

Secondly, I can say classical music, folk music, or [musics] which is used in music theraphy [are] good, because [these kinds of music beneficial to well being and health]. I’ve read several articles [about effects] of music. I showed them to my friend. Many scientific and medical studies have proved conclusively the tremendous effects of music upon the human physiology and anatomy.

The physiological and psychological effects of music as a healing art are well documented [throughout the literature]. [Healing music is controlling our auditory environments, facilitating learning and enhancing our immune systems to improving memory, reducing pain, managing stress, designing creative time management and exercise programs.] A study conducted at the University of California found that [scores on memory tests of Alzheimer's patients] greatly improved when listening to Mozart. The Mozart Effect is a well-known phenomenon that showed that participants who listened to Mozart performed better on spatial tasks.(Campbell 201-235)

Heavy metal music is believed to have psychological effects, but there is little definitive documentation on the subject. At the same time, the listeners and fans of heavy metal say that the music helps them deal with their problems. So, I didn’t say, “Heavy metal music is bad.” I didn’t know its dangerous and detrimental effects. But, after I saw Masaru Emoto’s experiments, I have changed my view. Now, I think heavy metal is bad.

Dr Emoto began to study the impact [of altering water by various factors of vibration and consciousness]. He studied water that had been altered by music - healing music, classical music, heavy metal music - and so forth. He placed distilled water in between two speakers and played one piece of music [fully at normal volume]. Then he froze the water. This experiment was repeated many times over with the same result. Classical music always produced beautiful crystals of slightly different colours [(at right)]. Healing music, a Tibetan mantra and folk music also produced beautiful crystals.

Heavy metal music [created distorted, formless, smudged image] that looked like a crystal that had exploded into a thousand pieces [(at left)].

Our bodies are 70 % water, and that makes them excellent conductors for sound and vibration. We are not just hearing with our ears. And, Masaru Emoto’s work demonstrates that we are constantly being influenced by the [sounds around]. So what does this mean to us and [our music preferences]? The good news is that everyone can choose what music they listen to. Music is a tool to be used for our advantage. [Whether that advantage is how to utilize our free time to its maximum effect or our work time to our benefit; ]we can be smart and use music effectively.

I want to [complete] with my heavy metal music [fun friend’s] words after our long debate [on evaluating] music: “Bad music can be compared to junk food; good only in small doses, not much there to keep you alive. Good music can be compared to real whole foods; it gives you lots of energy and power, and keeps you going for a long time. I have bad eating [habbits] and mostly eat junkfood, because I like [them] much more. It’s hard to change [habbits], but, at least, when I’m thinking or studying, I can [listen Mozart]!”



See you,
MrP