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Hi,
I've been using the words "odd days" and "even days" for years to refer to every other day of a week.For example I'd call Saturday, Monday and Wednesday "even days" and Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday "odd days".
But yesterday a friend of mine claimed that there isn't such words as "even or odd days" in English. I checked my Dictionary (Oxford Advanced Learner's) and found some instances of "odd" and "even" with numbers and not wth weekdays.

I really need some help to see whether it is possible to use such words in English and if they are commonly used in spoken English or not. If not, what words are being used?

Thank you in advance,

Iman
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Comments  
I have never heard/sees 'odd days' and 'even days' used in this way.
Hi fivejedjon,
So how do we refer to every other days of the week.
As an example imagine one has class three days a week, let's say Sunday,Tuesday and Thursday.
How would one say this in a sentence?
Is this possible? "I have class every other day." (In this case it's complicated to find which days of the week)

Regards,

Iman
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imantaghaviIs this possible? "I have class every other day." (In this case it's complicated to find which days of the week)
That is possible. It's no more complicated than guessing which are the odd and which the even days. We'd normally list the days.
Hi Iman,
Based on a quick internet search, it seems that a lot of people have trouble understanding odd and even days.
Clearly, there are 7 days in a week, making 4 odd and 3 even.
1.Sunday
2.Monday
3.Tuesday
4.Wednesday
5.Thursday
6.Friday
7.Saturday
Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday are odd days.

I guess a good alternative to "every other day" is "alternate" as in:
alternate Mondays/weekends etc
The service runs on alternate days.

Hamed
innertideSunday, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday are odd days.
Not if you take Monday as the first day of the week, which many people do.
Try out our live chat room.
innertideClearly, there are 7 days in a week, making 4 odd and 3 even. 1.Sunday 2.Monday 3.Tuesday 4.Wednesday 5.Thursday 6.Friday 7.Saturday Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday are odd days.
Not clear at all to most people. As Fivejedjohn has said, many people consider Monday the beginning of the week, (despite the way the calendar is arranged), leaving Saturday and Sunday as the weekend.

If i heard someone referring to even days and odd days I might think they meant days falling on the even and odd dates -- which means that this week Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday are even (October 12, 14, 16 and 18) and next week they will be odd.

Some communities restrict where you can park your car on even and odd dates, like this example:


No parking between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. on the even numbered side of the street on even # days
No parking between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. on the odd numbered side of the street on odd # days


Or when you can water your lawn, with a similar rule. I don't believe I've ever seen or heard anyone refer to even or odd days when they didn't actually mean even or odd dates.

As far as class schedules, in an American college or university students have "Monday-Wednesday-Friday (MWF) classes" (which typically meet for one hour at a time), and "Tuesday-Thursday (TTh) classes" which typically meet for an hour and a half each time. Most American schools do not have class on Saturday or Sunday.
Hi

I believe that, in Iran, Saturday is the first day; and then Sunday, literally, is Saturday plus one; Monday is Saturday plus two; and so on

Until Friday, which has no number because it is a holy day. I like the logic of it and I can see how some days are then odd and others even

However, I think the other contributors are right in saying that it won't translate - English rarely, if ever, uses numerals for the days of the week like that

Dave
Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday are odd days.
What is the basis for that? I have never seen or heard such classifications.
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