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Hi, all.

Is there any difference in meaning between the two sentences?

1. We've got to do something for our neighbors even though we don't like them.

2. We've got to do something for our neighbors even if we don't like them.

The way I see this is that even though should be followed by factual statements, while even if should go with non-factual ideas. So, in #1, 'we actually don't like them' and in #2, 'we actually like them.' Would you please confirm this?

One more question flashes across my mind.

A: Is he coming to the party?

B: I don't think so.

Here, can 'I don't think so' be replaced with 'I think not'?

Thank you.
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Maybe "even though" could be paraphrased by "in spite of the fact that".
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To supplement the previous answers, "even if" can sometimes mean "even though", as in #2 below:

1. We'll have to have the new neighbours round every Sunday even if we don't like them.

i.e. we'll have to invite the new neighbours round every Sunday even if [it turns out after meeting them tomorrow that] we don't like them.

2. We'll have to have the new neighbours round every Sunday even if we don't like them.

i.e. we'll have to invite the new neighbours round every Sunday even if [, as we discussed after meeting them yesterday,] we don't like them.

In spoken English, the "don't" in #2 might be stressed: "...even if we don't like them..."

MrP
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Comments  
Hi,

1. We've got to do something for our neighbors even though we don't like them. This means you don't like them.

2. We've got to do something for our neighbors even if we don't like them. This recognizes the possibility that you may or may not like them. Perhaps you haven't met them yet.

The way I see this is that even though should be followed by factual statements, (well, you could say 'even though we may not like them') while even if should go with non-factual ideas. So, in #1, 'we actually don't like them' (true) and in #2, 'we actually like them.' (not necessarily, see above.)

A: Is he coming to the party?

B: I don't think so.

Here, can 'I don't think so' be replaced with 'I think not'? Yes. However, I don't think so can reflect uncertainty but I think not is an emphatic negative.

Best wishes, Clive
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