+0
"In the days before the mass marketing of books, censorship was ___ source of ___, which helped the sale of the book and inspired Ralph Waldo Emerson to remark: “Every burned enlightens the world”.
A. a respected …opinion
B. a constant … guidance
C. a prime … publicity
D. an unnoticed … opposition
E. an unpromising … criticism"

The offical answer is C. I doubt it. Judged from Emerson's remark:"Every burned enlighteneds the world, we can tell that the censorship had bugs.

What do you think?
Comments  
I think C is the answer. It just means that if a book were censored, everyone knew it must be juicy(!), so would zoom out to buy it.
I think C is the answer. It just means that if a book were censored, everyone knew it must be juicy(!), so would zoom out to buy it, or would at least have heard of it.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
What if the book is censored and considered to have inappropriate content, and is prevented from publishing? :-s

By the way, could you please explain Emerson's remark: Every burned enlightens the world? Is "every" here referring to every book that is prevented from publishing?
What if the book is censored and considered to have inappropriate content, and is prevented from publishing?


There will have remained several copies of it and all people will want to read it. I agree, the answer is C.

In my country, once a communist state, occasionally there appeared books which the government withdrew from bookshops as soon as they were delivered. But several people would have already bought the book and would give it to friends. Banning a book was actually an advertisement.
Every burned enlightens the world.


Yes, "every" here refers to "every book burned". It enlightens the world, because many people want to and read it (they actually read the surviving copies). And there is some play on words, becuase burning produces light and Emerson uses the word "enLIGHTen" to show that these books bring light to the world and people learn a lot from them.
I agree that it's C; but I wonder whether the use of the Emerson quote is slightly misleading.

The first part of the statement relates to the distribution of books purely in terms of sales; but the Emerson quote surely implies that when books are banned or burned, it's often because they have 'enlightening' content (Galileo, etc).

I find it difficult to believe that Emerson was looking at things from the point of view of a sales and marketing director...

MrP
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I believe the correct quote is, "Every burned book enlightens the world."