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Hi all,

I was halfway writing my essay and got stucked with this simple word choice.

1. As I entered the studio, the yoga teacher was already in. I grabbed my yoga mats and placed them on the floor in ‘T’ shape just like (everyone/everybody/anyone/anybody) did. (which one is correct in this sentence?)

Thanks.
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" Anyone" means the same as " Anybody." It means any person.

"Everyone " means the same as " Everybody." It means every person.
Thanks....Emotion: smile
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JoevieeHi all,

I was halfway writing my essay and got stucked with this simple word choice.

1. As I entered the studio, the yoga teacher was already in. I grabbed my yoga mats and placed them on the floor in ‘T’ shape just like (everyone/everybody/anyone/anybody) did. (which one is correct in this sentence?)

Thanks.

Based on the context, the answer is "everyone".
When I entered the studio, the yoga teacher was already there. I grabbed my yoga mats and placed them on the floor in a T shape, just like everyone* else did.

*everybody is also fine.

[anyone or anybody is used with would: just like [anyone / anybody] (else) would (do).]

CJ
Thanks to all:)

I have another question here CJ,

Why 'as' is incorrect in this context?

Thanks
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Why is "as" incorrect?

As I was in the process of doing something
or while I was in the process of doing something is normally followed by an event (such-and-such happened) or by an activity (someone else was in the process of doing something else), not a state (so-and-so was there; the sky was blue) or a universal or generic truth (goldfish swim).

As I was walking in the door, [the phone rang / I noticed a smudge on the wall / a honey-bee stung me].
As I was writing a letter, [ Mary was reading a book / the children were playing].

*?As I was thinking about all the bills I owe, [my wife was present / the stool I was sitting on had three legs / the room was quiet / my shirt was dirty / the table was messy].

At least that's part of the explanation. The specific verbs enter and be also play into it. A person can't be in the place you enter as you enter; they have to be there before you enter, and then as you enter the room you notice them there, i.e., you notice (an event) that they must have been there already before you entered.

So you can say more comfortably,
As I entered ..., I noticed that X was (already) there.
Or:
As I entered ..., X was just arriving. (You were both arriving at the same time.)

as shows a much closer simultaneity than when.

Another way of looking at it is this: The time taken by the situation in the as clause should be equal to or greater than the time taken by the situation in the main clause. as generally sets up a span of time during which another situation happens. (The time taken to enter is less than the time the yoga instructor was there, so the combination of the clauses in your original version does not work particularly well.)

CJ
oooohhhhh..............understood:)

Thanks alot CJ. Your reply was very detailed. Really appreciate that:)
As isn't incorrect in this context. In fact British grammarians in particular have long preferred it to like in written English although even in Britain like is probably more common in spoken English. The following extract is from a book entitled A Practical English Grammar for Foreign Students written by A.J. Thomson and A.V. Martinet and printed at the Oxford University Press (Section 92):

"Like is placed before nouns and pronouns in the simpler types of comparisons:
e.g. He fought like a hero.
She cooks like an expert.

But if the noun or pronoun is immediately followed by a verb, i.e. if there is a clause of comparison, as not like should be used:

e.g. She cooks omelets in butter as they do n France.
Can you pour wine straight down your throat, as they do in Spain?
Do as I do."

Of course one need not agree with these and many other grammarians. In my opinion both as and like are correct in the last three sentences.
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