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Everyone smiled at the sound of the baby's laughter.

I don't think the above sounds logical, and I tend to reword it as follows:

Everyone smiled at the baby who was laughing.

Everyone smiled at the baby who made a sound of laughter.

Am I reasonable? Thanks.
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Hi,

Everyone smiled at the sound of the baby's laughter.

I don't think the above sounds logical, The sentence sounds fine to me

and I tend to reword it as follows:

Everyone smiled at the baby, who was laughing. This doesn't really say explicitly why they smiled

Everyone smiled at the baby who made a sound of laughter. This is a very clumsy and awkward clause

Clive
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AngliholicEveryone smiled at the sound of the baby's laughter.

I don't think the above sounds logical

Can you explain what about the sentence sounds wrong to you?
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Grammar Geek
Angliholic
Everyone smiled at the sound of the baby's laughter.

I don't think the above sounds logical

Can you explain what about the sentence sounds wrong to you?

Thanks, Clive and GG.

How could people smiled at the sound of ... ? I presume it should be more logical to say "smile at someone." Maybe, it just occurred to me that it's the logics of my mother tongue.
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Hi Angliholic. When we say "Everyone smiled at the sound of...." it means "everyone smiled when they heard the sound of...." It does not mean they "smiled at the sound" the same way they might "smile at the baby," although I can see why you might read it that way. Think of it as "At the sound of the baby's laughter, everyone smiled."

You can also say "he jumped out of bed at the sound of the alarm clock."

You could even say "he smiled at the memory of " something, or "at the thought of" something.

Does that help?
KhoffHi Angliholic. When we say "Everyone smiled at the sound of...." it means "everyone smiled when they heard the sound of...." It does not mean they "smiled at the sound" the same way they might "smile at the baby," although I can see why you might read it that way. Think of it as "At the sound of the baby's laughter, everyone smiled."

You can also say "he jumped out of bed at the sound of the alarm clock."

You could even say "he smiled at the memory of " something, or "at the thought of" something.

Does that help?

Thanks, Khoff.

Roger!

By the way, should I say "roger that" or just "roger" in this context?