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Hiya!

I just would like to know if the use of except if/except for (especially this last one) makes sense in the following examples. And if both happen to be OK, then is any of them more proper (or more commonly used) than the other?

Dialog:
A: Ah, so I cannot ruin this machine at all.
B: No, you can't. Well, except if you turn this switch, 'cause in that case it's gonna blow.

Other version:
B: No, you can't. Well, except for you turn this switch , 'cause in that case it's gonna blow.

Thank you!
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Hi,
I just would like to know if the use of except if/except for (especially this last one) makes sense in the following examples. And if both happen to be OK, then is any of them more proper (or more commonly used) than the other?

Dialog:
A: Ah, so I cannot ruin this machine at all.
B: No, you can't. Well, except if you turn this switch, 'cause in that case it's gonna blow. OK

Other version:
B: No, you can't. Well, except for you turn this switch , 'cause in that case it's gonna blow. Not OK, not correct grammar.

Clive
Comments  
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oh OK, thx!

And how about "...except for when you turn this switch..."?
Hi,
And how about "...except for when you turn this switch..."?

It's informally said sometimes with the same intended meaning, but really it suggests that you will turn the switch, not just that you might turn the switch.

Clive
Thank you!
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

I you use the word except before the sentence. for example: Except we are not married.

What do you mean?

You need to know what was said just before this.

eg Tom and I argue all the time. We would get a divorce, except we are not married.

except here introduces a clause that limits the preceding statement.

Clive