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Hi,
is it possible to leave out some prepositions after "except" and "than" in cases like:

There is a special party in almost every month of the year, except (in) August, I think.
There is a gas station at every intersection, except (at) the one near Ecology Town.
We are going to stop at every town, except (at) Death Town.
In my sentences there are fewer mistakes than (in) your sentences.
There's much more traffic here than (in) Ghost Town.
In August it's hotter than (in) April.


Any comments? Thank you in advance Emotion: smile
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Kooyeen I tend to add the one after except then put the preposition.Emotion: smile
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KooyeenHi,
is it possible to leave out some prepositions after "except" and "than" in cases like:

There is a special party in almost every month of the year, except (in) August, I think.
There is a gas station at every intersection, except (at) the one near Ecology Town.
We are going to stop at every town, except (at) Death Town.
In my sentences there are fewer mistakes than (in) your sentences.
There's much more traffic here than (in) Ghost Town.
In August it's hotter than (in) April.


Any comments? Thank you in advance Emotion: smile

Hi Kooyeen,

There is no need to repeat the same preposition which already existed in the sentence.

It will sound redundant to include the 2nd one.

There is a Seven-11 on nearly every main intersection in this town except .
I'd gladly throw out the extra prepositions after except, but not after than!

To me, except is to be construed as contrasting the nouns, not the prepositional phrases. except occurs within the prepositional phrase, just as and or or can do, e.g., with you and me, in rivers or lakes. Of course, except requires a preceding every or its equivalent.

... in [every month except August]
... in [every town except Waco]
... the titles of [all the songs except that one]
(???except of that one)
... appropriate for [all seasons except winter] (??? except for winter)

than seems to require a whole prepositional phrase if a whole prepositional phrase occurs before than as the item to be compared. The same is true for constituents larger or smaller than a prepositional phrase. The key here is to use equivalent constituents on both sides of than.

stronger X than Y >> stronger with the molybdenum additive than with the chocolate (*than the chocolate)
busier X than Y >> busier on Mondays than on Thursdays (*than Thursdays)
less effective X than Y >> less effective dry than wet
less effective X than Y >> less effective when it's dry than when it's wet (*when it's dry than wet)
more likely to succeed X than Y >> more likely to succeed if educated at Harvard than if kept in a cellar (*than kept in a cellar; *than in a cellar)


CJ
Yes, because except is a preposition while than is a conjunction.
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