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Hello, I would like to ask a question on the grammar of "Exchange A for B"


I typically understood "Exchange A for B" as "In order to get B, I exchange A with B".


But in a book I am studying called A Course in Miracles by Helen Schucman, there is a sentence that says "Would you not exchange this awareness(of peace) for the awareness of fear". This sentence near the end of T-12.II.9 of the <Foundation for Inner Peace> version.


It seems like A and B in this case should be reversed. How should I grammatically understand this sentence?

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Psyhendrix typically understood "Exchange A for B" as "In order to get B, I exchange A with B".

Your understanding is correct.

PsyhendrixIt seems like A and B in this case should be reversed. How should I grammatically understand this sentence?

The grammar is ordinary and normal. As to the meaning, you should read further in the text. Maybe the author will explain his idea.

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Is it grammatically possible that "exchange A for B" has the same meaning as "exchange B with A"

in some cases?

Psyhendrix"exchange A for B"

You give up B and take A. You have one, but not both.

Psyhendrix"exchange B with A"

Thinking more closely, I read that as you have both A and B. But you put A in B's place and you put B in A's place. So it is more a reciprocal movement. You still have both.

No, you misunderstood it. The correct answer is :"In order to get B, I exchange B with A." You want to get B, but you take B to get A back. It's contradictory, isn't it ?
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