Which is preferable in a resume cover letter?
1. I expect to graduate from high school in June, 2006.
2. I will graduate from high school in June, 2006.

thanks in advance!
1 2
Which is preferable in a resume cover letter? 1. I expect to graduate from high school in June, 2006. 2. I will graduate from high school in June, 2006.

"I expect to" seems to imply the possibility that you will not graduate. Say "I will".

Michael DeBusk, Co-Conspirator to Make the World a Better Place Did he update http://home.earthlink.net/~debu4335 / yet?
Scout typed thus:
Which is preferable in a resume cover letter? 1. I expect to graduate from high school in June, 2006. 2. I will graduate from high school in June, 2006.

Both of these seem to be OK to me. Putting them together makes number 1 sound more modest, but without seeing that, number 2 is unexceptional, unless your marks are consistently low and you are in real danger of failing to graduate.

David
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Scout typed thus:

Which is preferable in a resume cover letter? 1. I ... 2. I will graduate from high school in June, 2006.

Both of these seem to be OK to me. Putting them together makes number 1 sound more modest, but without seeing that, number 2 is unexceptional, unless your marks are consistently low and you are in real danger of failing to graduate.

About no.2 - I feel uncomfortable with "will" here. "Shall" comes more naturally.
Alan Jones
Scout typed thus: Both of these seem to be OK ... and you are in real danger of failing to graduate.

About no.2 - I feel uncomfortable with "will" here. "Shall" comes more naturally.

My own feelings are exactly opposite. "Shall" might make a potential employer think the applicant is not quite in touch with how things go 'round here.
About no.2 - I feel uncomfortable with "will" here. "Shall" comes more naturally.

My own feelings are exactly opposite. "Shall" might make a potential employer think the applicant is not quite in touch with how things go 'round here.

I recommend using "will" in the US. I can't imagine any prospective employer thinking the worse of you for not using "shall." "Shall" is more likely in the UK, but I'm an American and can't tell you whether it's preferable to "will."

Bob Lieblich
We will overcome
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Scout typed thus:

Which is preferable in a resume cover letter? 1. I expect to graduate from high school in June, 2006.

This is the better attitude to have normally, I think, because it reminds one that he is not in full control of what happens.
2. I will graduate from high school in June, 2006.

Both of these seem to be OK to me. Putting them together makes number 1 sound more modest, but without seeing that, number 2 is unexceptional, unless your marks are consistently low and you are in real danger of failing to graduate.

But employers are probably want someone with more confidence than normal good sense would provide. And you don't want to look like your marks are low, as David correctly points out. No. 2 it is, I think.

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I recommend using "will" in the US. I can't imagine any prospective employer thinking the worse of you for not using "shall." "Shall" is more likely in the UK, but I'm an American and can't tell you whether it's preferable to "will."

In the first person, "will" indicates "I am resolved," whereas "shall" indicates a simple, matter-of-fact description of the future. In second or third person, it's the other way around.
In most cases, "I shall do it" would be fine, but (in my humble opinion, of course) in a résumé or cover letter, determination and resolve should be communicated when the opportunity presents itself. In that context, the word "shall" could come across as passive.

Michael DeBusk, Co-Conspirator to Make the World a Better Place Did he update http://home.earthlink.net/~debu4335 / yet?
(discussing "2. I will graduate from high school in June, 2006."
About no.2 - I feel uncomfortable with "will" here. "Shall" comes more naturally.

My own feelings are exactly opposite. "Shall" might make a potential employer think the applicant is not quite in touch with how things go 'round here.

Is this a Pondian difference, or generational? (I'm 71, English.)

"Will", in the first person, seems the wrong verb here, implying that graduation will call for great determination on the applicant's part - probably not what is intended! "Shall", in the first person, makes a simple prediction. But perhaps that's not true in AmE, or in the language of younger people.
Alan Jones
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